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Full text of "Antioch News 11/29/1978"

-' . ,' 



L 




WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29. J 978 



//■ 





93rd YEAR No. 22 



FIFTEEN CENTS 





improving 





• Plans being made 
fo pave Main St. 



. 




By BEVERLY CARY 

Among the topics discussed as the 
committees of the Antioch' village board 
met Monday evening was the development 
of Williams Park^ 

This was discussed in length by parks 
and recreation coordinator Sue Koppa. She 

.said ' that the park board is recommending; 
moving the fence and light poles, thus 
enlarging the Little League field to 
regulation- size. • ~r . 

The field would be resodded and the 
dugouts removed. The park commission 
would pay for half of the cost* not to exceed 
$2,000. She urged the board to generate 
the interest needed in helping the Little 
League maintain the field and facilities. . 

THERE REMAINS $17,000 to be spend 
for the improvement of Williams Park. 
Superintendent of public works Walt 
Shepard and trustee Don Amundsen 
agreed that plans and specifications for the 
improvements be drawn up no later than 
March or April since the money must be 
used or allocated by August of 1979. 
• Shepard said that' removal of the 
concrete at th e old Standard Oil building is 
necessary to accommodate addltional~park=~ 
ing space. 

Amundsen = suggested that the board 
submit a requisition for $10,000 of the 
available funds. 

MAYOR MICHAEL HALEY said that" 



money is available for an expanded senior 
citizen's center. ■■ ~~ 

Mrs. Koppa said the village has the 
funds and would like to see a five-day meal . 
I program available to the seniors. 

Plans are being made to pave highway 

= 83 (Antioch' s Main Street) from North 

Ave. south to route 173. The work should 

begin In April ,"■«# 1979; ^J%^ federal , 

government will pay 80 percent of the cost. 
Shepard stressed the need to upgrade 

the traffic signals at Lake and Main streets, 
and also suggested that the "walk" sign be 
changed from the present "scramble" or 
button-pushing, system. 

, THE VILLAGE BOARD is giving Murrill 
Cunningham the go-ahead, issuing a 
building permit to start construction on the 
first of three proposed apartment build: 
ings. _ ■ 

Mayor Haley read- the agreement of 
Cunningham to comply with all village - 
ordinances. Amundsen made the point that 
Cunningham should be required to supply 
a temporary water retention program to 
take care of the first unit, prior to Issuance 
of an occupancy permit. All members of 
-the-boariLverb aHv agreed to the su gges^ 

tion; 

Police chief Chuck Miller said, "If 
nothing drastic comes up, such as strikes 
or a full-scale investigation, the police 
department budget should end the year in 
the black. 



HERE'S HOW Scott Gallagher of Antioch fired in 25 points in last 
Wednesday's opening game against Barrington. More basketball 
inside. .(Photo by _ Andy Dugenske.) 



Sawmill park damage being inyesti 




l 



The Antioch Police' De- 
partment is looking for 
information on = what ap- 
pears to be a second case of 
vandalism' at > the com- 
munity's bicentennial saw- 



Looking forj^gift f<" the 
man who has everything? Get 
him a calendar to remind 
him *hen the payments are 



mill park. „_ 

Officer William Kukla, 
on patrol Sunday morning, 
noticed that a portion of the 
fence surrounding the park 
had been broken down. The 




damage appeared to 
deliberate, police said. 

The destruction ,of the 
fence apparently took place 
Saturday night and police 
are askings any possible 
witnesses to contact them. 

After previous damage to 
the sawmill park late hvthe 
summer the \andals\were 
^aTighTfollowing"investiga- 
tion by the police depart- 
ment. .*^T= ■ 




PRACTICING FOR THEIR Christmas ^concert are members of 
AntinRh-Upper^Grade School junior ban d. From left: Cathy Giordancv 
Sanfly Skupien and Michelle Poison. The concert will be held SundayT 
Dec- 17/- 'M *«N ' '*■--' --- ......... 



Page 2 



THE ANTiOCH NEWS 




3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 II 12 13 14 15 16 

17 16 19 20 21 22 23 
% 25 26 27 28 2930 




BROUGHT TO YOU BY 




BflWt fiwetid Heme 

Modi's oldest Juneral Home 
Under (he samei ownership. 

"Our Family's Serving Your Family" 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30 

Antioch Jaycees - Brauhaus, 8 p.m. 

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1 g 

T-P Taws & Paws Square Dance - Legion Hall, 8 p.m. 

Antioch Kennel Club - First Bank, 7:30 p.m. 

~. =- * , 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2 

."Androcles And The Lion/J^it PM&L, 8:30 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3 

"The Messiah" at Antioch High School, 8 p.m. 
Day of Renewal at St. Benedict's Abbey, 10:30 

MONDAY, DECEMBER 4^ 

Christmas tree Lighting Ceremony - Village Hall, 6:30 

Free Movie at Antioch Theatre, 7 p.m. 

Antioch Woman's Club Pot-Luck , Noon 

Village Board ' . ^ 

885 Club 
- American Legion Auxiliary, 8 p.m. 
Antioch Coin Club - State Bank, 8 
Grade School Band Parents - Upper Grade School, 7:30 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5 

Grade, School Board, 7:30 

St. Peter's Woman's Club, 8 p.m. 

Sequoit Lodge No. 827 AF&AM. 7:30 



WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 

License plafes 
go on sale 
here Friday 



. The State Bank of Anti- 
och is an authorized agent 
in the selling. of the. new 
multi-year Illinois passen- 
ger.-car license. plates. 

William E. Brook, presi- 
dent, has announced that 
the bank will begin selling 
the plates Friday, in co- 
operation with the office of 
the Illinois secretary of 
state. 

, The multi-year plates are 
made of aluminum and will 
last for five years. The 
'■ — eolors-arc-blue-letters-on-a-^ 
white, background. 

The State Bank will be 
participating in the stag- 
gering of passenger car 
registration for three 
months in 1979: September 
October and • November. 
Fees are prorated on a 
monthly rate. 

Expirations and fees are 
determined by the last two 
digits of 1978 license num- 
bers. 

..Sale of plates over the 
counter by the State Bank 
will require a 1979 pre-print 
renewal form or a 1978 
vehicle identification card 
by applicants.^ 




MULTI-YEAR PLATES ARRIVE - C.J. Murphy (right), representing 
Allan J. Dixon, secretary of state, displays the new multi-year Illinois 
passenger license plate which will go on sale Dec. 1 at the. State Bank 
of Antioch. Admiring the rtew plate are -William E. Brook, bank 
president, and Phyllis Kapischke, supervisor of the teller department. 



Salem woman dies after co 



. A 29-year-old Salem, 
Wis., . woman died last 
Thursday night of injuries 
she. suffered the previous 
Sunday in an auto accident 
in Antioch township. 
Mrs. June M. Rayniak 



died at Victory Memorial 
Hospital in Waukegan. 
Sheriff's deputies said she 
was a passenger in a car 
involved in a two-vehicle 
collision at Grass Lake Rd. 
^and^Hy. 83, south of^AntK 



is ion 

och. 

Deputies said, the driver, 
her husband John, suffered 
chest and leg injuries. The 
other driver, : Patricia 
Ronan, 23, of Gray slake, 
also was hurt. 



Shopping Spree winners nam 







DECEMBER 

■6- Free Blood Pressure Clinic^t Lindenhurst Civic Center, 
"3p,m. to S p.m. 

.8.9.15,16 - "Androcles and the Lion" at PM&L, 8:30 
10 - Pancake Breakfast with Santa at St. Peter's, 7 to noon 
17 - Upper Grade School Christmas Concert, 1:30 






sr 



532 LAKE ST. 
TO 395-2303 

'Once a gentleman, always a gentleman." Charles Dickens 



More than $400 in gift certificate prizes are being given 
away as thetresult of the week-long Shopping Spree 
sponsored by the Antioch Chamber of Commerce & 
Industry. „ z (J 

Caroline Matthiesen of Round Lake was the grand prize 
winner, receiving $100 from the Globe" of Antioch. 

Myrus J. -Nelson of Antioch will receive a $75 gift 
certificate from Reeves Drugs and Kathy Turner, also of 
Antioch, won S50 from the Lakes Area Advertiser. 

"IN-STORE PRIZES" given away by the various 
participating merchants were won by: • 
Antioch Drugs, Rose Gardula. 
Antioch Savings & Loan, L. Stafles. 
Antioch True Value, John F. Romer. 
Barnstables/Left Bank, Elmer M. Stieler. 
Ben Franklin Family* Center, Roberta Knackstedt. 
BJ's Fashions for Men, Janet Hawks. 
DeGraffs Family Shoes, David M. Hyson. 
Erickson's Sewing Center, Phil F. Mitchell. 
First National Bank of Antioch, L. Sherwood. 
Foremost Liquors, Ralph Gunarson. 
Four Squires, John Jcmilo. 



George's Texaco, Leo Bednar. 

Gibbs & Jenssen Carousel, Mrs: David Cannon.^ 

Globe of Antioch, Helen M. Burnett. 

Hahn Jewelry, Barbara Spillner. 

Johnson Jewelers, A. Goodrich. 

Lakes Area Advertiser,- Pat Kile. 

Lasco's Florist, MaryJendryzka. 

McDonald's Restaurant, 1 J. Jendryzka. 

Pin & Pleat, Walter Slowney, Salem. 

Poison's Dietary Foods, Florence Wollstein, Kenosha. 

Reeve's Walgreen Agency -, Jo Anne Vermillion. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Phil Mitchell. 

Stanely's Men's Fashions, Judy Tadda, Trevor. 

State Bank of Antioch, Klaus E, Reulbach. 

The Shoe Box, Ed Draag, Lake Villa. 

Western Auto, Frences Vojtik, Cicero. 



■^■■(.N^S? 




^Hairy" days m 
'til Christmas 

Mome in and get your 
holiday perm today. 



7H l JN."Ma|nSji". 

395-3225 



OPEN^ 
Tues. - Sat r 




Meat Specialists 
Par Over 50 yrs. 



ANTIOCH PACKING HOUSE, IIIC. 
North Main Street at Hit RJI. Tracks 

Tues. to Sat! 9 to 5:30 ' 395-3951. 

Closed Sun. & Mon. Ample Free Parking 

Sale Items Thurs., Fri., Sat. 

Sorry, no phone orders on sale items. 



^ 6 ? 
C» v 



U.S. PRIME 

POT ROAST 



89< 



Lb. 



FANCY - SMALL - MEAT 

PORK SHANKS 



79 



Lb. 



OUR OWN - HICKORY SMOKED 

SMOKED BUTTS 



$179 

I Lb. 



■9# 



e* OUR OWN - HICKORY SMOKED 



l* 1 



ya 



DINNER FRANKS 



1 



69 

Lb: 



<& 



t e c 



LUNCHEON SPECIAL 

BOLOGNA 



59 



Wlb; 



iqliday cookbook;! 



g»W»W«W.7i^ 



*,«44WW««a6»«* * 



MM 









NETD1 Ho mrSgjgp°* $L5Q 



...with Hallmark Christmas purchase of $5.00 or 

more. Now yoiTcan make family" holidays 

Jhroughout the yearfestive celebrations! Eighty" 

pages packed with recipes and creative ideas! Visit 

us soon to see all our new Hallmark Christmas gift 

ideas — and capitalize on our great Holiday 
Cookbook offer! Hurry, Cookbook supply limited. 



JACKIE'S HALLMARK CARDS, GIFTS. 
AN0 OFFICE SUPPLIES 

928 Main St^nrioch, III. §95-1 555 



HOURS: Mon. - Thurs.=9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Fri. 9:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m^ Sat. 9:30 a:mrto 5:00 p.m. 



1970 Hillmark Cord*. Inc. 



' 4 



) 



1 



r, 

le 

ia 

B, 




<\ 



NAMES 
in the 

News 



TAMPA, Fla. — The 
U.S. Air ■ Force has pro- 
moted Theresa J. Shamb- 
lin, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Geroge L. Shamblin 
Sr. of Lake Villa to the rank 
, of airman first class- 
Airman Shamblin is 
serving at MacDill AFB, 
Fla., as a law enforcement 
specialist. 

She is a 1977 graduate of 
Grant High School. 

MlCHAELBY-RNES,-an- 

Antioch resident, finished 
second in the Masters Divi- 
sion (40 years and older) of 
the Hinsdale Marathon 
Nov. 19. 

In running the 26-mile 
course in 2 hours and 58 
minutes, he qualified for 
the Boston Marathon to be 
run next spring. 

The 40-year old Byrnes 
finished only 30"* seconds 
behind the Masters winner 

. and was 31st overall. 

Byrnes' wife.'MaryAnn, 
and their three children, - 

' Scott (6) Keith (4) and 
Michelle (2), were there to 
pheer him on- in his first 
marathon. 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



Page 3 




:■;■■■. 



1979 PASSENGER CAR 



LICENSE 




■ ■- 

I: 



m 



wMm 





ON SALE HERE 



H 




One insurance 
agent is 

the best 



A handful of insurance 
policies won't guarantee 
complete insurance protec- 
tion. When* you ask your 
Country Companies agent 
to take care of all your insur- 
ance needs, he can spot the 
gaps that leave you and your 
family unprotected. 

Your Country Companies 
agent wilt also look for 
overlapping coverage and 
unnecessary . policies , while 
making sure you have the 
right kind ofjnsurance in 
the right amounts. 
'■ Find out for yoursel f" 
why o.ne agent — your 
Country Companies agent- 
is the best policy.for health, 
life, auto. home;Harm and 
business insurance. 

The Country Companies 
We're a tittle different than 
most insurance people. 9 




Beginning December 1, 1978, we will once againS 
be cooperating, with Secretary of State Alan J. 
Dixon's office in the sale of passenger car license 
plates. 

We are especially thrilled this year to be a part of ~ 
this program because we will be selling the new— 
MULTI-YEAR license plate. This MULTI-YEAR 
plate will be made- of aluminum and will last for 
five years. The colors are. blue letters on a white 
background. 



We will be handling the following expiration 
months: September 30, 1979, October 31, 1979, 
and November 30, 1979. 



m 




m- 







HERE'S HOW , IT WILL WORK: When you 
received your 1979 renewal application you should 
have noticed two boxes at the top with the words. 
"License Expires" and "Reduced Fee". The 
second box shows a lower fee than normal. The 
-annual passenger license plate fee remains either 
$18.00 or $30.00. The "Reduced Fee" is because 
you are paying for less than a year registration. So, 
be sure and remember to bring in your PRE- PRINT 
"RENEWAL FORM or a 1978 VEHICLE IDE^TIFTT 
CATION CARD when you come for your new 
license plates. 



;-■;■■ 

m 



TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS CONVENIENT SERVICE.... 
THE* LICENSE PLATES WILL BE ISSUED IMMEDIATELY 






Page 4 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



The Antioch News 

i3toarb Winning &t toSpaper 

1978-*— 

Illinois Press Association 
Newspaper Contest 




HAGAR THE HORRIBLE 



TMe FPoMT POOR 





'With a Stern Eye... 



the SOVEREIGN STATE mmmmmmmw* 



the Pfarr Corner 



* 



Attempting 




p/o 



of AFFAIRS 



I 



in 



polling place mess 



By GRACE MARY STERN 

Lake County Clerk 

The County Clerk's office is still digging 
out from under, a mduntain of vote 
recorders, documents . and notes from 
election judges." 

The victors have "recovered from their - 
celebrations, and the losers have prepared 
resumes for the inevitable job-hunt. 

And I have begun to answer the many ■ 
letters that have come in from either angry 
voters or dismayed judges with regard to 
some, of the procedures^ of the Nov. 7 
general election. 

THE MOST PREVALENT complaint, 
and the one that was most upsetting to 
. voters, was the "lost Polling Place," 

U has been very difficult to explain to a 
commuter who missed his train, why he 
was finally ablc=to vote at a church (after 
visiting three different places) when his 
yellow voter's identification card clearly 
insisted that his polling place was the 
junior high school C r ^= 

The difficulty arises from the irrational 
nature of the explanation.' 

THE COUNTY^BOARD and the county 
clerk, in ji ^remarkable venture into 
non-partisanship, created and imple- 
mented something called "The Voting 
Zone Plan" for the" primary elections' in 
March of 1978. " 

In effect, it "clustered" precincts for 
voting purposes so that two or. three 
precincts voted together in one large 
(well-lit. airy ,_ warm and- accessible to the 
handicapped) polling place, such as a 
school gym orchurch hall. 

The plan was a great dollar-saver, and 
streamlined "the whole elections system. 
Unfortunately, the primary turnout was so 
low the test hardly counted, but comments 
in general were favorable. A Voter's l.D. 



card was mailed to every registered voter, 
indicating his new (and "permanent" 
polling place). 

Alas, two committeemen filed a lawsuit, 
challenging the legality of the project. Arid 
they were successful. The county board 
- county clerk team had been ahead of its 
tirne.^nd two jumps ahead of the statutes. 
The court 7 ruled that additional polling 
places were to be designated and used at 
the November election. The grand plan had 
to be unraveled and re-knit in a few short 
months.- 

BY THE TIME the county board 
completed the task of designating those 
additional polling places, it was well jntoj 
October and too late to .send a new and 
different l.D. card. The ensuing barrage of 
publicity concentrated on the "change of 
^polling -place." 

"Newspaper inserts were distributed 
countrywide through local newspapers as 
well as via those plastic bags that get hung 
on everybody's front porch — - press 
releases ..were issued, radio interviews 
were aired. In short, every effort was bent 
toward publicizing the changes. One has to 
wonder^ if= one is in the business of 
off the count, zipping through the ballots 
read nothing, heard' nothing and seen 
nothing about the. question. 

.^_WE WERE VERY UNHAPPY about thet 
conf usion since . efficient elections and 
convenient voting have been one of the 
prides of our office. We're going back to 
work on it ... ' 

The voting booths without curtains (we 
_call thorn the Model 3-A's) created some 
distress also. While some voters felt "free 
and uncohfined," others felt "nude and 
exposed." We shall.havc to concentrate on 
that problem too. 

There were the usual occasional' confron- 
tations between a voter and a judge — 
_- between a voter and a voting mactiine^T 



sl- 
it- 



THIS YEAR THE 

-GOVERNMENT-IS-SPENDI NG- 

OVER $1500 PER SECOND! 





"UNBELIEVABLE! 

RIGHT! AND SOMETHING 
MUST BE DONE ABOUT IT! 




HOW ABOUT HAVING FEWER 
SECONDS NEXT YEAR? 




If there is a God; 
v/hyrdidhe 
create winter? 



By JERRY PFARR 

This week we are getting our annual reminder that golf 
great Ben Hogan was right when he said: 

"Anyone who lives in the North in the winter is either 
"crazy or a victim of. circumstance?" = 

The only winter sports that* interest me happen near the 
warmth and glow and crackle of a fireplace. 

That's why Monday and Tuesday's ice and snow was 
about as welcome as a shoe full of freezing slush. 

Most people once agreed with me that it's pretty stupid 
to spend the winter months in this part of the country. But 
that's before so many of you fell in love with^ skiing and 
snowmobiling. . 

Now, you can actually get intoah argument with the 
folks whose bumper stickers say, "Think Snow!" 



THERE ARE NOW three subjects you can't discuss 
peacefully — politics, religion and snow. 

Well, 1 don't care what your politics and*religion are, but' 
I hope all of this winter's snow falls or drifts info your 
driveway instead of mine ... that is,=jf you like it so much. 

George Adkins, the United Parcel man,} came in with 
jsome packages Tuesday and said:^ \ \ 

"Who ordered all this cold weather?" *■" 

= Since you brought it through the door with you, do we 
;- have. to sign for it?", one of us asked. • 

"No, I'll take it -out with me when 1 go," laughed 
George. 



BASEBALL PITCHER Tommy John, who just left the 
Los Angeles Dodgers for the New York Yankees, also 
made a lot of sense last week when he expressed his 
philosophy: 

; "Do your best all day and say your prayers at bedtime. 
Then get' a good sleep and leave the worrying to God 
because he's going to be up all night, anyhow." 






r 



A newspaper dedicated to people marching 
to their own drummers. 



The Antioch News 

p.o:boxs 

antioch, jllinois 60002 - 

Published weeMyJnWednesdays. Annual subscription 
J6.50 m Illinois and Wisconsin: tS elsewhere. Single Copy 
5 cents. Entered as Second Class matter at Antioch. 
Illinois post office. In case of change of address or 
non-dehyered copies notify the Publisher. 952 MainSL. 
Antioch. r llUnois=€0Cp2. Phone 312-395-5755. 



Jerry Pfarr 

Editor!* Publisher 
Linda Walker 

Advertising Manager 




ijBaaasst) 



Today's 
Brighteners 

A little girl went to church - " 
for her first time, and she was 
full of questions. When a 
baby was presented for bap-" 
tism, her uncle said, "The 
parents are giving her to 
God." 

When the minister returned 
the baby to the parents, she 
whispered, '"I guess Gpd 
didn't want that one." 



Office Cat - Baxter 



Three boys were walking- 
home from school onez^dayj 
and "Were bragging on% _ their 
parents. 

"My dad's a doctor,'', said 
one. . "When I'm sick I go 
to him. Why, 1 can get well 
for nothing." 

"So what?" shouted the 
second. "My dad's" a" lawyer. 
If I get into trouble. I go 
to him, and I get help for 
nothing." -V 

Not to be outdone,' the 
third boy. said, "That^sjiot 
much. My dad's a preacher. 
I can begoodfor nothing^". 



The Antioch News 




... has more paid subscribers than 
any other newspaper in the area. 
...There must be a reason for this. 



... Please join us for a year or two 
and help us figure out why people 
prefer this neat, complete hometown 
newspaper. ijL 

Mall to the AntiochNews, 
P.O. Box S, Antioch^ I L 60002 




-.- Enclosed is my payment. 
-( } $6.50 for one year. 
A ) $10 for two years. 



NAME. 



STREET. 
CITY__ 




STATE. 



Z\P 




', ) 



. 



' 



$ 1 5 prize goes 
to Laura Stewart 

Laura Stewart not only won the Antioch News basketball 
contest last week, but. she regained the "family, 
championship" from her son; Harry, 

- . * • * * . - 

Harry tiejd for third this week, just missing out on a prize 
when he lost in the "tie-breaker." 

... - ' ■ *..-,.'■ - 1 - 

But Laura will receive $15 in cash from Pedersen Bros! 
Implement Co. because she picked Libertyville to defeat 
Antioch by 17 points. Libertyville won by 18. 

Second prize'goes to Allan Figi, our 13-year-old expert 
from Trevor, who picked Libertyville by 15 points and' will 
receive a $10 gift certificate from A&B Printing Service. 

THREE FORECASTERS TIED for third, missing the 
Antioch-Libertyville outcome by four points. In the 
"tie-breaker," Antioch's loss to Elgin Larkin, George 
Schoenleben came, closest and will receive a $5 gift 
certificate from Andre's Steak House. Tim Huebrier and 
— Harty-Stewart-lost-in-the— tie-breakerr^— — - 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER^, 1978 



Page 5 



Another challenge faces basketball fans this week. Once 
again $30 in prizes will be given to the persons who come 
Ihc closest to predicting the outcome qf the Antioch-Grant 
game. - • 

Entries close Friday at 8 p.m. Be sure to have them in 
the Antioch News office, or postmarked, prior to that time. 
A blank appears injtoday's paper. 





THAT MAGIC TIME of the year for youngsters, when Santa comes to 
town to hear what they want. for Christmas, happened in Antioch last 
Saturday. That wonderful old gentleman from the North Pole toured 
the town on a fire truck, then stopped at White's Ice Cream Parlor 
where hundreds of children were waiting for him. The Chamber of 
Commerce & Industry once again sponsored Santa's visit.^ 



Christmas Tree event set 

The Parks and Recreation Department will hold the 
Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony on Monday, Dec. 4 at 6 
T>.m. at the Village Hall. 

Following the tree lighting, there will be a free movie at . 
the Antioch Theatre, "Sinbad." The seating is limited. 
Tickets can be obtained at the Chamber of Commerce 
office, Parks and Recreation office and: Police station.^— 

During the Christmas season the Parks and Recreation 
Department is offering "Babysitting" for your con- 
venience. This program will include movies,, crafts and 
games. No children under three years old, please. 

The dates this program will be held are Fridays Dec. 8 
and 22 and Mondays Dec. 11 and 18. On Fridays it will be 
held at the Scout House and on Mondays at the Fire 
Station basement. ^^- f 

.Time for babysitting is 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 



SQUIRE S 

414. LAKE STREET, ANTIOCH 

GREAT GIFT IDEA 
FOR UNDER *30 




--E-tiV! 



Let's keep 
Antioch shoveled: 







The Snow Mt. Mock 
pullover from Lord Jeff! 
A, handsome Jacquard 
pattern across the 1 
chest and arms 
highlights our 
mock turtle 
pullover with 
all over cables. 
And while it looks 
and feels like 
wool, it's actually 



made of Orion and is completely 
machine washable. Sizes 
M-XL in a variety 
of colors. 
$28.50 




Coffee & Cookies 



Buy 3 bows, get 1 FREE 



— ^^ • - ,- « ■ 

Park Ave^right behind Barnstables) 






I 





Holiday 

St ore Hoars 

Mo nday-Friday 

9i30-9t00 

Saturday . 

9j30-6:00 

Sunday 
10:0©-4i00 




Page 6 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS 




MachSne 



70 YEARS AGOs NOVEMBER 27; 1908.. 

The trust fund left by his widowed mother, by which his ; 
board was paid and from which he was. paid seventy-five 
cents a week, being nearly exhausted, George L H. Tiffany 
of Waukegan. Friday night carried out an oft made threat 
and committed suicide rather than go to the poor house. 
Tiffany was the last remaining scion of a family that in the 
sixties well represented Waukegan's wealth and aristoc- 
racy. He was a book worm of gentle parentage, gently 
nurtured, he would never work. He had the reputation of 
having read every book in the Waukegan library. He was 
sixty-five years old and, was averse to human toil. He 
would never hold a job and insisted on being supported by 
others, a hard task because of His weakness for strong 
drinJc. 

The parents of Miss Sophia Gever of Liberty Corners, 
whose marriage was reported last -week wish to make an 
emphatic denial of the; rumour, and state that there is no 
foundation whatever for the story, 

Farmers in the vicinity of Volo have been thrown into a 
pitch of real excitement during the past week, through the 
appearance of a pack of wild wolves. The wolves, about a 
dozen in number have been seen by a number of different 
farmers and plans are now being made for a wolf hunt. 
^Creditors of the Besley Brewing Company of Waukegan 
filed a petition in bankruptcy. The Besley Brewery was 
•founded in 1853 by the late William Besley who operated it 
with his sons until his death someyears ago. 



40 YEARS AGO: DECEMBER 1, 1938 

Representatives of the Antioch Fire department were 
among the 150 firemen and their .guests who attended a 
= venison dinner given by the WaucOnda department 
Monday evening. 

The third annual gala community party sponsored by the 

.Junior Class will be held Saturday at 8 o'clock at the 

=scft~5b \; Fun for every irhember of the family .has been the 

r_" motto in planning this year's event. There will be dancing 

for the V'jittcrbajgsV;' with music by the high school swing 

Tband, Hostettcr's orchestra will play for old-time dancing. 

_For those with nodesirejo "swing it" there will be bridge 

and five hundred. A clever floor show is to beanother high 

^point in the evenings entertainment with refreshments 

available in the cafeteria through-out the evening. 

^Rdsellc Brewer and her famous "-Seeing Eye" dog, Lady 
Luck, will appear. in a lecture in the Aritioch Township 
High School auditorium Friday evening. .'._- 

Miss Buddie Musch is employed at the grade school. 




WEDNESDAY. 

Real estate 
taxes can be 

paid at bank 

William E. Brook! presi- 
dent of the State Bank: of 
Antioch. has reminded 
residents that' the bank" 
once again will be., the 
collecting agent for the 
Lake County treasurer's of- 
fice. . 

The second installment 
for real estate' taxes for 
1977 will be due by Friday, 
Jan. 5. and all banks will 
cease collection after that 
date. 

The second installment 
bill will indicate the balance 
due for the 1977 tax year, 
with exemptions, Home- 
steads, etc. applied. 

In the evejit the first 
installment has hot been 
paid, there will be a seven 
percent penalty due Dec. 1 , 
1978, on that installment. 

"For convenience and 
safety the taxes can be paid 
at the State Bank," Mr. 
' Brook said. 



FACTS And 
FICTIONS 

It's not true that the United 
States is wholly dependent on 
foreign countries for its fuel. 
Imports- actually fill less' than 
half of our petroleum needs, 
and we have substantial coal 
resources to draw upon. 



NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



20 YEARS AGO: NOVEMBER 27, 1958 

Eighth grade students of the Grass Lake School will be 

featured on radio station WKRS in Waukegan. The 

students will discuss ''Youth and Our Government." 

Jewelry business as a business hasn't changed much 

since 1902 but more than 2,000 people last week saw that a 

place of business certainly can change. The people took 

part in the three-day opening of. the rfewly remodeled 

Kculman's Jewelry at 913 Main St. The business, begun 

by Olive and the late William Kculman, has grown every 

year says Charles' Keulman, son of the founder and; 

present owner. 

■ When Lindenhurst was organized two years ago, 
neighboring municipalities looked somewhat askance at 
the proposed jobs to be taken care of by cooperation. That 

Took has now changed to admiration. The Lindenhurst 
Policemen's Ball last weekend helped change the opinion 
of many. 

10 YEARS AGO: NOVEMBER 28, 1968 

- A gold gas meter was installed at the home of Northern 
Illinois Gas Company's one-millionth customer, the Harry 
Hanus family. 

Bicycle registration^ day for 1969 licehsejTwUI begin at 
the Antioch police stationon Dec. 1. 

Lake County's electronic' voting system saved the 
taxpayers over S70, 000 this year, according" to County 
• ^ Clerk Truman Gerretsen. . 

Antioch area servicemen and women are not going to be 
forgotten this Christmas. Project Vietnam is going to take 
iCare^pf that. Some„22Q_ packages have been made up for the 
4^Christmas mailing. 

TTTT H B1 B 5 1 1 1 1 » B I H ■ U M Tl 1 1 1 ■ I ■ I 

Free Estimates: 
312-ttft-16M 




THE CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY of. the Northern Illinois Junior 
Football League is presented by Ron Vogt to Antioch Viking 
Lightweight co-captains Tom.Adams and Kevin Haarstad". (Story- on 
next page.) 



Not -all coal is the same 
CoaJjmined in different parts 
of the country may vary in 
hardness, ignition tempera- 
ture, moisture and sulphur 
content. Some types of coal 
with lower sulphur content 
burn "clean. " Now, Coal En- 
richment, a now process de- 
veloped by FMC Corpora Uon, 
makes it possible to upgrade 
much of that "clean" coal, for 
use by utilities throughout 
the country. 

Coal is still considered a 
good luck charm in parts of 
England and Ireland, but its 
use as a fuel is of fairly recent 
vintage: probably the 12th 
century.' , 




RETIRING- COACH Dave Miller told; parents at last week's;! 
season-ending Viking football-banquet: -"Thank- you for giving me you|§ 
boys to work with these past nine years." Seated at right is Stevfl 
Wapon, Antioch High School coach. . 



The first American, fire engine, built in 1654, was a 
wheeled machine that spouted water' from a cistern filled 

by bucket-passers. ~- 



Canon 

3E 




Real value in a GREATcamera! 





FOUR SEASONS INSULATION, INC. 

ROUTE 83 
LAKE VILLA, ILLINOIS 60046 J* 

Atfic Insulation & Certified Applicators 

Side Walls Quality Workmanship 

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• Exclusive breech-lock 
lens mount 



1 8 9.50/ Includes 1.8' Lens and Case 




Christmas Hours 
Starting Friday 
Daily, 9:00-9:00 

,Sat."l 0:00-5:00 
Sun. 12:00-4:00 



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896 Vi AAairuStreer 
( Entrance on Broadway St. 




5 M 




GREENHOUSE 
ol Anil 



',-''* ' 



tock 



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E" 

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tz 



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vtiil suit 

POINSETTIA WONDERLAND 

Fri?, Sat., & Sun. - Dec. 1, 2 & 3 

9^q.m.-4 p.m. 
^COFFEE &DONUTS SERVED 



Over 20,000 Red, Pink and Whiter 
.' Home-grown Potnsettias 

Fresh Green & Pine Cone Wreaths= 



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101 oM ok otqj ptad pmdm^ 
(luflujcg (fern 3 dmji 

HANGING POINSETTIA BASKETS 



X 
M 
A 
S 

C 
A 

I 

y 
s 




V 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS 



WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



Viking dinner fills 2 rooms 



Page 7 



About 450 Vikin&parents and players filled the Antioch 
High School cafeteria and commons for the annual Antioch. 
Viking Football banquet. Ron Vogt served as master of 
ceremonies in the commons where the heavyweight and 
lightweight teams met, while Tom Bittner hosted the four 
featherweight teams in the cafeteria. Brother Vincent, of 
the Order of St. Benedict, gave the invocation to begin the 
banquet. . . 

After everyone finished eating, both M.C.'s spoke 
briefly. about trie objectives of the Viking organization and 
introduced its officers and coaches. President Leo 
,McGrain gave a brief history of early. Viking beginnings, 
which led him to the "Viking of the Year Award." This 
year's first, award was presented, posthumously, to Jim 
Walsh who served as treasurer of the organization until 
1974. Mrs. Vi Walsh and Dan Walsh, an early Viking 
coach, accepted the award in his behalf, this year's other 
f * Viking of the Year Award," was presented to Pres* 
Reckers, who found financial support for the Viking 
Footbalt during its early years." : 

TED DeROUSSE, ASSISTANT defense football coach at 
Antioch High School,, addressed those present in the 
commons and introduced the keynote speaker, Steve 
Wapon, head football coach at Antioch High. The Feather- 
weight teams in the cafeteria were addressed by assistant 
sophomore coach Steve Scott and assistant varsity coach 
Rich Brown. 

Leo McGrain awarded to the Viking heavyweight team 
the district championship trophy, and to the Viking 
lightweight team, the district championship trophy and the 
league championship trophy. He was proud to announce, 
"This was the first league. championship for a Viking 
team." 

Retiring coach, Dave Miller, was given a special award 
for his nine years of. service to the organization. Dave 
thanked the Vikings for the award and thanked .the 
parents, "for giving me your boys to work with these past 
nine years." years." 

Coaching* plaques were also awarded to the six varsity 
players who helped coach eactfbf-thc Viking teams this 
•year. 

LIGHTWEIGHT HEAD COACH Russ Lehn, next 



introduced his coaching staff: Joe Bissing, Dave Miller 
and Gene Lehn. Together they introduced the. team* and 
awarded participation trdphies to the boys. Craig Sheedlo, 
Les Zitkus and Tom Adams were voted by their teammates 
as the most valuable players, and were given trophies for 
this honor. Craig Sheedlo was also presented his "Most 
Valuable Player" trophy from the league championship 
game. - 

Heavyweight head coach, Roy Haase, introduced his 
coaching staff; Jack Humphreys, Ron McKenzie and Greg 
Bodin. They introduced the heavyweight_ team and 
awarded the boys participation trophies.-. Andy Lehn, Ray 
Bergman and Bill Carney were voted by their teammates 
as the most valuable, players, and were honored "with 
special trophies. 

Tom Bittner introduced the Featherweight coaches and 
asked them to announce their most improved players for 
the season. Buccaneer coach Don Poulter introduced his 
coaches: Tom Bittner, '• Jerry . Elrod and Kevin Walsh. 
Participation trophies or plaques were awarded to .all 
Buccaneers present and two "Most Improved Players" 
trophies were presented to Mike Byczek and Steve 
Mueller. , Raider coach Mike Brady then introduced his 
coaches: Rod Arion and Mike O'Hara. Participation 

Please turn to page 9 



Introducing State farm 
Newer Home Discount 




If your home is le.ss 
tha/i7yearsoid, . 
you may save with 
State Farm. Find 
out how much., 
Call me today. 

Like a good neighbor. 
State Farm is there. 




PJCKWITT 
390 Lake An tioch 5 

395-1089 



iitate Farm Fire and t.'iwuii liy Company , 
Htwrvf Office: Blonminjotm, IHinuin _ 



a special day just for you 



■ « ■ 



i 






kf» 









Sunday, December 3rd at all Five Globe Stores! 



• Fox Lake7 AntlochVLakehurst • Downtown Waukegan • The Waukegan Plaza 
..It's a very special day for those who believe holiday shopping ought to be a friendly, relaxed, 
family oriented activity! It's for those who want to shop early anci save an extra 10% on a full 
-selection of famous namebrands. It's for those who prefer to deal with a neighborly store...that 
knows and calls its customers by name! It's for those who want their selections gift wrapped without 
extra charge. It's a very special day just for you and your family to shop in an unhurried fashion. 



:-• 



ve: 



i 



wm 



r 3 



"THE VIKING OF THE'YEAR" award was 
given to Pres Reckers for arranging financing 
for the football program in its early years. 
Leo McGrain (left), president.of the Vikings, 
makes the presentation. 




A 



S 






off 

every item 



in our sto 



except sale merchandise! 




This Sunday, December 3r 
From 11 a.m. til 4 p. 





r " - 




Wrap! 



i 



Win One of Fifty 
FREE^TURKEYS 

Ju.l r.oit<« ot any on. of rh. Fiv. Glob. Sl«.il 
Ijo Purcho.. N.tmory . . /Mid no! b. p.r.t.M to w,nl 





Sunday is for yguf 
don't miss it! 



SHOP GLOBE FOX LAKE^ANTIOC'rT.,.SUNDAY...11 TIL 4 




t^t 



Page 6 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS 










70 YEARS AGOt NOVEMBER 27, 1908 ;. 

- The trustfund left by his widowed mother, by which his 
board was paid and from which he was paid seventy-five 
cents a. week, being nearly exhausted, George H. Tiffany 
of Waukegan, Friday night carried out an oft made threat 
and committed suicide rather than go to the poor house. 
Tiffany was the last remainingscion of a family that in the 
sixties well represented Waukegan's wealth and aristoc- 
racy. He was a book worm of gentle^ parentage, gently- 
nurtured', he would never work. He had the reputation of 
having read every book in the Waukegan library. He was 
sixty-five years old and was averse to human toil. He 
would never hold a job and insisted on being supported by 
others, a hard task because of his weakness for strong 

drinR. --^4= -^ :^= 

The parents 'of Miss Sophia Gever of Liberty Corners, 
whose marriage was reported Jast week wish to make an 
emphatic denial of the rumour, and state that there is no 
foundation whatever for fhe story. 

Farmers in the vicinity of Vdlo have been thrown into a 
pitch of real excitement during the past week, through the 
appearance of a pack of wild wolves. The wolves, about a 
dozen in number have been seen by a number of different 
"farmers and plans are now being made for a wolf hunt. 

Creditors of the Besley Brewing Company of Waukegan 
filed a petition in bankruptcy. The Besley Brewery was 
founded in 1853 by the late William Besley who operated it 
with his sons until his death some years ago. 

40 YEARS AGO j DECEMBER 1, 1938; ^ 

Representatives of the Antioch Fire department were 
among the 150 firemen. and their guests who attended a 
venison dinner given by ' the Wauconda department = 
Monday evening. 

The third .annual gaWcommunHy party sponsored by the 
J unior: Classiwill be held Saturday at . 8 ^o'clock ; ja_t the^ 
^school. Fun for every member of .the family has been =thc 
T motto in planning this year's event. There will be dancing , 
for the^'jiUcrbflgs." with music bythe high school swing. 
band. Hosicttcr's orchestra will play for old-time dancing. 
For (hose with no desire to "swing if" there will be bridge 
.and five hundred. A clever floor show is to be another high 
point in the evenings entertainment with refreshments 
available in the cafeteria through-out the evening. 

Roselle Brewer and her famous "Seeing Eye" dog, Lady 
Luck, will appear in a lecture in the Antioch Township - 
High School auditorium Friday evening. 
Miss Buddie Musch is employed at the grade school., 

20 YEARS AGO: NOVEMBER 27", 1958 

Eighth grade students of theGrass Lake SdhooLwill be 
featured on radio station WKRS "in; Waukegan. The 
students will discuss "Youth and Our Government." 

Jewelry business as a business hasn't, changed much 
since 1902 but more than 2.000 people last week saw that a 
place of busin ess certainly can change. The people took 
part in the three-day' opening of the newly remodeled 
Keulman's Jewelry at 9 13 Main St. The business, begun 
by Olive and the late William. Kculman, has-grown every 
year says Charles Keulman,. son of the founder and 
. present owner. 

When Lindenhurst was organized two years, ago,, 
neighboring municipalities l6oked somewhat askance at 
the proposed jobs to be taken care of by cooperation. That 
look has now changed to admiration. The Lindenhurst 
Policemen's Ball last weekend helped :change the opinion ; 
of many. '• 

10 YEARS AGO: NOVEMBER 28, 1968 

A gold gas meter wa$ installed at the home of Northern 
Illinois Gas Company's one-millionth customer, the Harry 
Hamis family. ^ = > ^ 

Bicycle j^gistratibn i da> ^foTT969 licenses will begin at 
the Antioch police station on Dec. 1. 

Lake County's electronic voting system saved the 
taxpayers over $70,000 this year, according to County 
Clerk Truman Gcrrctseni 

Antioch area servicemen and women are s npt Agoing to beZ 
forgottcn this Christmas. Project Vietnam is going to take 
care of that. Some 220 packages have been made up for the 
Christmas mailing. - I 

jf/r t b tt a inn ra 51 in nni rri ut t m > a i r rr n 

Fre© Esttaaterc * 
S12-SM-1M0 



WEDNESDAY 

Real~estate~~ 
taxes can be 

paid at bank 

William E. Brook, presi- 
dent of the. State Bank of 
Antioch, has reminded 
residents that the bank 
once again will be the 
collecting agent for the 
Lake County treasurer's of- 
fice. * , . •: 

The* second installment 
for' real estate 1 taxes' for 
1977 will be due by Friday, 
Jan. 5, .and all banks will 
cease collection after that 
date. 

The second installment 
billwill indicate the balance 
due. for toe 1977 tax year, 
with exemptions, Home- 
steads, etc. applied. 

In the event the first 
installment has not been 
paid, there will be a seven 
percent penalty due Dec. 1, 
1978, on that installment. 

"For convenience arid 
safety the taxes can be paid 
at the State Bank,", Mr. 
Brook said.* 



NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



i. 




FACTSAnd 
FICTIONS 



THE CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY of the Northern Illinois Junior 
Football League is presented by Ron Vogt to Antioch Viking 
Lightweight co-captains Tom Adams and Kevin Haarstad. (Story on 
next page.) 



It's not true that the United 
States is wholly dependent /on 
foreign countries for its fuel. 
Imports actually fill less than 
half of our. petroleum needs, 
and = we! have substantial 
resources to draw upon. 




- Not all coal is the same 
Coal mined in different parts 
of the country may vary in 
hardness, ignition . tempera- 
ture, moisture' and sulphur 
content. Some types of coal 
.with lower sulphur content 
burn "clean." Now, Coal En- 
richment, a new process de- 
veloped by FMC Corporation, 
makes it possible to upgrade 
much of that "clean" coal. for 
use . by utilities throughout 
the country. 

Coal is still considered a 
good luck charm in parts of 
England and Ireland, but its 
use as a fuel is of .fairly recent 
vintage: probably the 12th 
century. 




RETIRING COACH Dave Miller told parents at last week's 
season-ending Viking football banquet: ! 'Thank you for giving me your 
boys-to^work-with-these past=nine^years7 ,, -Seatedrat Tight Is Steve 
Wapon, Antioch High School coach. 



The first American fire engine, built in 1654, was a 
wheeled machine that spouted water from a cistern filled 
by bucket-passers. ^ ^.g^^ vL /:-^^ 



Canon 




Real value in a GREATcamera! 






FOUR SEASONS INSULATION, INC. 

g@ 0^ ROUTE 83 W «S 

jSBiL AKE VILLA, ILLINOIS 60046^ ffi 



© 

j 



c 



- 



$1 89-50 



• Canon quality man 
economical price range 

• Center-weighted 
through-the-lens 
metering 

• Hot shoe lor cordless . 
flash photography 

• Accepts nearly 40 
Canon FD and FL series 
lenses . _ * ,- 

• Exclusive breech-lock 
lens mount 



Includes 1.8 Lens and Case 



Attic Insulation & . Certified Applicators 

Side WaJJs Quality Workmanship 

■ o a a.ag.gjifl ft.Q.uuujLfl a a ft a.a.aj a.a a,g a.g g.fl a a, uu 







A 



Christmas Hours 
Starting Friday 
Daily 9:00-9:00 
Sat, 1 0:00-5:00 
Sun. 12:00-4:00 




™896 VMAain Street 
^ (Entranc e on Broadway StV 






Jg 
6 

L 
I 

A 
G 

E 

P 
L 
A 
N 
T 
S 



GREENHOUSE 
of Antiock 

rt^B-^mi.No.of 173 
Wl/l 

POINSETTIA WONDERL 



Fri. f Sat., & .Suru ■- Dec^ 1^ 2 & 3 
^ a.m.-4 p.m. 
CQFFEE ^p^GjslUTS SERVED 

Oyer 20 .OOORedf Pink^ntf Wh i te * ' 
Horrje-g ro wn Pol nset t las: 

Fresh Green & PineCqneWreaths 



;■ 



»t iF^^ry-— - 



HANGING POIN$ETTIA- BASKETS 



X 
Ml 
A 
S 

C 
A 
C 
J± 
U 

s 



stt. 



x 



b 



X 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY 

Viking dihne.rf : itt&~2 rooms 



NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



Page 7 



About 450 Viking parents and players filled the Antioch 
High School cafeteria and commons for the annual Antioch 
Viking Football banquet. Ron Vogt served as master of 
ceremonies in the commons where the heavyweight and 
lightweight teams met, while Tom Bittner hosted the four 
featherweight teams in the cafeteria. Brother Vincent, of . 
the Order of St, Benedict, gave the invocation to begin the 
banquet. 

After everyone finished eating, both IvTC.'s spoke 
briefly about the objectives of the Viking organization and 
introduced its officers and coaches. President Leo 
McGrain gave a brief history of early Viking beginnings, ' 
which led him to the "Viking of the Year Award;" This 
year's first award was presented, posthumously, to Jim 
Walsh who served as treasurer of the organization until 
1974. Mrs. Vi Walsh and Dan Walsh, an early- Viking 
coach, accepted the award in his behalf. This year's other 
"Viking of the Year Award," was presented to Pres 
Reckcrs, who. found financial support for the Viking * 
Football- during its early years. 

TED DeROUSSE. ASSISTANT defense football coach at 
Antioch High School, addressed those present in the 
commons and introduced the keynote speaker, Steve 
Wapon, head football coach at Antioch High. The Feather- 
weight teams in the cafeteria were addressed by assistant 
sophomore coach Steve Scott and assistant varsity coach 
Rich Brown. 

Leo McGrain awarded to the Viking heavyweight team 
the district championship trophy, and to the Viking 
lightweight team, the district championship trophy and the 
league champrtinship trophy. He was proud to announce, 
"This was the first league championship for a Viking 
team." .. , 

Retiring coach, Dave Miller, was given a special award 
for his nine years of service to the organization. Dave 
thanked the Vikings for the award and thanked the 
parents, "for giving me your boys to work with these past .-■ 
nine years." years."" 

poaching plaques' were also awarded to the six varsity 
players whq helped coach each of the Viking teams this 
year. ' 

LIGHTWEIGHT HEAD COACH Russ Lehn, next 




"THE VIKING OF THE YEAR" award was 
given to Pres Reckers for arranging financing 
for the football program in its early -years. 
Leo McGrain (left), president, of the Vikings, 
makes the presentation. 



■•a-*" 



weasel4 

jfiiiit 

'TBI! 







WEEKDAY SPECIALS 5-9 PM. 



MONDAY 

Brochette of Beef 

Mushroom Pilaf 

$3.95 



introduced his coaching staff: Joe Bissing, Dave Miller 
and Gene Lehn. Together they introduced the team and. 
awarded participation trophies, to the boys. Craig Sheedlo/ 
Lcs Zitkus and Tom Adams were voted by their teammates 
as the most valuable players, and were given trophies for 
this honor. Craig Sheedlo was also presented his "Most 
Valuable Player" trophy from the league championship, 
game. , 

Heavy weight, head coach, Roy Haase, introduced his 
coaching staff: Jack Humphreys, Ron McKenzie and Greg 
Bodin. They introduced the heavyweight team and 
awarded the boys participation trophies. Andy Lehn, Ray 
Berg matt and Bill Carney Were voted by their teammates 
as the most valuable players, and were honored' with 
special trophies. v 

Tom Bittner introduced the Featherweight coaches and 
asked them to announce their most improved players for 
the 'season. Buccaneer coach Don Poulter introduced his 
coaches: Tom Bittner, Jerry Elrod and Kevin Walsh. 
Participation trophies or plaques were awarded to all 
Buccaneers present and two "Most Improved Players" 
trophies were presented to. Mike Byczek and Steve 
Mueller. Raider coach Mike Brady then introduced his 
coaches: Rod Arion and Mike O'Hara. Participation 

Please turn to page 9 



Introducing State Farm 
Newer Home Discount 




If your home. is less 

than 7 years old, 

you may save with 

State Farm. Find . 

out how much. 

Call me today. 

Like njjood neighbor. 
State Farm is there. 



HILIi fAIM 

IH1UUNCI 



"1 



PICK WITT 
390 Lake Antioch' 

395-1009 



Slate Farm Fire and Cwuulty (*<imptiny 
!Honw Officv; BbinmirtKtim. lltimuM 



a special day just for you... 





Sunday, December 3rd at all Five Globe Storesl 



I • Fox Lake • Anlloch • Lakehurat •/Downtown Waukegan • The Waukegan Plaza 

...It's a very speciafday for those who believe holiday shopping ought to be a friendly, relaxed, 
family oriented activity! It's for those who want to shop early and save an extra 10% on a full 
selection of famous name brands. It's for those who prefer to deal with a neighborly store.,.that 
knows and calls its customers by name! It's for those who want their selections gift wrapped without 
extra charge. It's a very special day just for you and your family to shop in an unhurried fashion. 






Off 

every "item 
in our store! 

except sale merchandise! ' 



ii I 







Sunday, December 3rd 
11 am. til 4 p.m. 





THURSDAY 

Stuffed Peppers 
Italian 
Baked Tomatoe 



WEDNESDAY 

Alaskan King Crab 
Bake - Seafood Bisque 
? $5.95 



with 



FRIDAY 

Lake Perch 

with Cole Slaw 

$3.95 



$3.25 



Open i 5- (un 



5 p.m. - 4 m Sunday - Closed lues. 



FREE 
Gift 



Wrap! 




Win One o1 
FREE TURKEYS 






No Pufthow N«M*o*y 



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395-< 



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west of Rt. 59 on Hwy. 173, tato* 





plpase.. dotft miss itl 

; SHQSglOBE FOX LAKE. ANTIOCH. SUNDAY.. 11 TIL 4 



■ 




Page 8 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS VyEDNESDAY NOVEMBER.29, 1978 

fl 'Naokin 



i 









of w 




JttittiitiiJ^:. 



Students.in the 8th grade shpp classes at 
Antioch Upper drade School have begun., 
their "World of Work" unit. .". 

Several students have invested their 
hard-earned cash in stocks to help form a 
school corporation called ''Napkin Holders 
lnc> .' . - ,, . '-■ . " 

Students were. job-trained for assembly 
line work. While on the assembly line, they 
will produce more than 400 napkin holders 



and will be. paid for holders sold. 

Many students should be walking out of 
the shop with, a healthy check for stock, 
invested, dividends, labor and sales com- 
mission. AH of which helps point out the 
real."World of Work." 

The cost of each napkin holder will be $4; 
the ending date for sales will be Dec, 8. 

The napkin holders make excellent 
Christmas presents. 



r r 



USING A RADIAL-ARM SAW is Joel Fries, cutting wood for a. napkin 
holder. Eighth grade students In Antioch have formed a classroom firm 
called "Napkin Holders, Inc.", 



Woman's Glub sees Indian arts, crofts 



The guest speaker at the 
Nov. .20 meeting of the 
Antioch Woman's Glib was 
Susan Regit/, of Villa Park. 



She discussed the .arts 
and crafts of the Indians of 
the Southwest. ' 

Samples of tiasketry, sil- 



-" " * *" 



MK 



MK 



MIC 



yt 



ATTENTION MEN: 

Tuesday evenings 
set aside just for you. 

HAIRSV/Lis BY WENDY 

By Appointment^Only . 

Call 395-67 77* K 



vcr, weaving, pottery and 
ceremonial items of the 
Navajo', Hopi and Zuni 
Indians were displayed. 

Hostesses included 
Kathryn Kulack, Wanda 
Barthel, Polly Bruhn, , Ila 
Lasco, Jan Burdick, Donna ■ 
Olson, Trudy Anderson, . 
Phyllis Bucar :and Muriel i 
Jennings. 

The club's next meeting • 
will be Monday, Dec. 4, at 
it he First Bank of Antioch at 
12 noon. It will be a 
Christmas Party and = pot 
luck luncheon. - 



»K 



31 IC 



DiK. 



IX KZ 



3MC 




Taxicabs were introduced 
in London around 1823. 




Children's Portrait 




ANTIOCH UPPER GRADE School students Nick Zeien and Ed Macek 
finish pieces on a belt and disc sander in the eighth grade shop classes 
that have begun their "World of Work" unit. 



Christmas Special 



3 Days Only 
Nov. 20, 27 & Dec. 4 



l 

2: 

8 



Full Studio Sitting^ 
by Appointment 

8x70 1 p; II 
4x5 Portrait Studies 

Only $ 49 50 

Ages to 6 years old 
Guaranteed Christmas delivery 



Phone Today 395.5554 



RusK Studio 



141 Cheri Lane; Antioch, III. 60002 *?!£$& 



4% 



I 



t 




WORKING JDN A TABLE SAW is Derek. 
Olsen^ a rrfember of the Upper Grade 
School's "World of Work" program. 



^ 



^i 



~t^ 



^—^ 



Plutarch, the .famous Gree k biographer, snored. 



&^»JSJiM>* ft * ^tt * fr^^^^^W> ^ 



I 



| 

I with each 
f 15-piece 

Bucket 
or 

2,Upiece_ 
Barrel of 
Chicken. 



%**&*» jell*"* 






H' 



& 








THE ANTIOCH NEWS 



Cont i nued from page 7 

trophies or plaques were awarded to all Raiders present 
and the two "Most Improved Player" trophies were 
presented to Jack Davis and Frank Hajvey. 

SEAHAWK COACH Ken Clark then introduced his 
coaches: Fred Rakoncay. and Jack Fields. Participation 
trophies or plaques were awarded to all Seahawks present, 
and the two "Most Improved Player" trophies were pre- 
sented to Bill Kaht and Matt Humphreys. Warrior Coach 
Don Rodgers next introduced his coaches; Rich Ant- 
kowiak, Rick Johnson. and Rob Nau man. Participation 
trophies or plaques were awarded to all Warriors present 
and the two "Most Improved Player" trophies were 



WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



Page 9 



for super season 



presented to Dave- Hart and Steve Behrendt. 

Sup Garland' and Kathy Humphreys were thanked for. 
being checrleading advisors. Jenny Garland and Ann 
Humphreys, this season's cheerleading coaches, then 
gave placques or trophies to all Viking cheerleaders 
present at the banquet. 

ALL SIX' TEAMS combined in the commons for the 
drawing of winners in the 1978 benefit. Pres Reckers drew 
the three lucky tickets. First prize, a $200.00 A&P 
Shopping Spree donated by Teresi Chevrolet and Olds, 
was won by G.J. Cadmus of Wtldwood. Second Prize, a 
SiSd.OO man's suit donated by BJ's Fashions for Men was 
won by Rod Garland of Antioch. Third prize, His and Her 
Sweaters donated by 'Four Squires, was. won by Mike 
Madsen of Antioch. 



<e 



Or U 
Buy One |i 
for s 2. I 



.0% 



aCS 






isi 



| ^LDeccmber 2* h while 'supplies last. | 
Just ask us. ._ j; , h I 



THE SECOND INSTALLMENT ON 

1977 

REAL ESTATE 






IS DUE 



JANUARY 5, 1979 






FOR CONVENIENCE AND SAFETY 

PAY THEM AT 



440 LAKE STREET 
PH ON E 31 2-395-2700 






Jj 



| RTE.59 

| &ME. 113 

I: AIStlOCH 



phono 395-3G47 



K*r fi drpuallor lruurr.1 lu i*9Mt 

FtNi 



ItmOL «(W> 



Wwlew lake Cij^'ft^aftgwl fB<wfe 
A leadw Since 1894" ^ x 



A FULL 

SERVICE 
DANK 



Page 10 



THE ANTIOGH NEWS - WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



* 




1 Androcles' opens here Saturday 



Madrigal Feast at CLC 




The play "Androcles and the Lion" opens at 8:30 p.m. 
Saturday at the PM&L Theatre in downtown Antioch. . 

Reservations can be made by calling 395-3055. Tickets 
are S3 and $J. • 

-Doors open at 7:30 and ticket reservations should be 
picked up by 8:15. Curtain time is 8:30 for all 
performances. Additional performances are scheduled 
Dec. 8, 9, 15 and 16. 

The author is George Bernard Shaw, a confirmed 
atheist. As you listen to the lines of the play it is often 
difficult to believe that such a non-Christian would allow 
the Christians to win so gloriously. 

SHAW HAS SHOWN both sides of the pictures with 
humor. For instance, "Onward Christian Soldiers" is sung 
when the Romans bring Christians on stage. The hymn 
was not written until several centuries later, 
1 The Uon (Todd Seisser) is played professionally but not 
. as fiercely as the real thing. The lion dances with 
Androcles in the first scene and by the last scene .you will 
know who is in charge; the lion, the Christian of Caesar-r 

THE CAST INCLUDES Hank Apostal as Androcles, 
Seisser as the Hon and^Tracy Teltz Kiederlen as Lavinia; 



h^V^^^Pi^Voi^^h^^h^^h^^Pi^Vfc^^^^V* ^^^(^(■'^^h^^*^^^-^^".^^.^^-^^'^^^-^^ -^PK* ^^ "-■^h^^»^t^-^^^^^ 



Bev Patmburg, president of Avon Players, is Megaera 
and Ken Scheske of Antioch is playing Emperor Caesar. 
• Martin Domeracki of Antioch, a board member of Avon 
"Players, is the captain. The cast also includes Charlie 
Brown of Trevor, Steve Buri, Larry Bersie, Don Beveroth, 
Bob Quinn, Frank Greenwood and Andrew Biel. 

Aileen Biel is stage manager, Pat Sershon is in charge of 
costumes, Ed Sershon and Alex Apostal are on lights and 
set design is by Bill Sershon, also the director. 



Seven College of Lake 
County students are among 
the entertainers at the fifth 
annual Madrigal Feast 
scheduled for Dec. 2 and 3 
and CLC. including Rosline 
Scheske of Antioch. Dave 
Rostol of Lindenhurst is 
also in the cast. 

Artistic director is John 



Mills, a CLC graduate, who 
has been active in the 
coordination of King 
Richard's Faire. 

Tickets for the feast may 
be obtained at the CLC 
bookstore or information 
may be obtained by calling 
the activities office at 
223-6601. exf. 410. 



"The Messiah" at AGHS Sunday evening 





HAPPENINGS at 




On Sunday evening, Dec.' 3; at 8 p.m. in the Antioch 
High School auditorium the Community Chorus will again 
bring to life the beautiful music of the Christmas portion of 
"The Messiah.^ 

There can be no .better way to start the Christmas 
Season than to attend this most traditional of all Christmas 
con certs . 

i 

The 90 voice choir will be under the direction of Ralph 
Brooke, who is also chairman of the Fine Arts Department 
of Antioch High School. The soloists are soprano Betty 
Beveroth of Paddock Lake; Kim Anderson of Antioch; Eva 
Harper of Lake Villa will sing the alto role; Ken Smouse of 
AntiocrTwill be thlTtenor and Bernard Izzb of -Elmhurst will, 
sing the bass role. 



Tracy Teltz Kiederlen of Antioch will be the pianist and 
Suzanne White of Waukegan will be the organist. 

Reservations for the concert may be made by calling 
395-1259. Tickets are available from several members of 
the chorus and will probably be available at the door the 
night of the performance. 

A modern critic has stated it thus: "Through the music 
of "Messiah" we participate, ima new way, in the life of 
the Saviour. At the outset we are identified with the 
prophets who speak. When the chorus sings "For unto us 
a Child is born," we are no longer prophets but shepherds 
with them. And when the strains of the Pastoral Symphony 
reach our ears, we, too; offer up a lullaby to the new-born 
iKing;'^-- ^ ' ^ ^K 

A more fitting start for Christmas cannot ; be imagined. 



STEAK HOUSE 



Make Your 

Holiday Reservations 

EARLY 

Phone [815] 678-2671 



•CHRISTMAS EVE 

Regular Menu 
Serving 4 P.M. to 9 P.M. 
•CHRISTMAS DAY 
. Roast Turkey and Regular Menu 
. Serving 12 Noon to 9 P.M. w - 
•NEW YEAR'S EVE 

Special Menu, Favors, Live. Music, 
-Dancing - Serving 4 R:M, to ? 



ft-l ?" 




Join The Bristol Bunch For Brunch 

C Glass ol Champagne And A Buffet That's Superb 
Sewing Sundays 10 JLM. to 2 P.M. Only $3.50 

414-857-2302 



Sriatol ®ak& Country Club 



Located on Rt. 50 
2.5 mi. West of 1-94 




Belgians claim that "French" 
fried potatoes actually orig- 
inated in their country. 



Plus Andre's 2nd Annual 
New Year's Eve Package Dinner 

(Limited Advance Ticket 
Reservations Only) 



r" 



•NEW YEAR'S DAY — 

Regular Menu 

Serving t2 Noon to 9 P.M. 

NOW OPEN FOR LUNCHES 

Mori, thru Fri .-11 a.m. to 2 p.m. ■ - 



YEAR'S EVE 



Room 



FRIDA Y FISH FRY S2.50 



197V£D!NNER/THEATRE REASON 

Running weekends starting Jan, 13. 



For reservations and information 
Call (81 5)678^2671 

•^ mj. N.brjU.TO on US -12rRichmcSniI 



per coupl 



Includes: 



BANQUET HALLS A VAILABLE \ 

Panics' from 25 to 750. Weddings, bridal 
showers, reunions, retirements, dances, ban- 
quets & all other occasionst 



Bowling;^ 
Cash Prizes, 
Favors, Buffet, 
Open Bar 9-2, 
Champagne 



$| £.5.0 

per person 

Includes :~ 



Favors", Buffet, 
Jgpen Bar 9-2, 
Champagne 



Required - Call for Information 



SX3CORSOWSC3C3W3S; 




-75G i W. Hwy. 173; Antioch 



395-1155 



j 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



c' 



» »■ X «l " . 




Paflo 11 



■ ^ ^^ i* a ■ m m i 



■ ^■ * "» « <»f > * < a i 



CONGRATS TO Sue Girten of Antioch High School for 
being the only local girl selected to the 15-player 
Northwest Suburban Conference all-star. volleyball team, 



e way with 

ANNIE MAE 



THE ANTIOCH JAYCEES are planning another neat 
event — a "Pancake Breakfast with Santa," on Sunday, 
.Dec. 10. v, , i 

The breakfast will be held from 7 a.m. till 12 noon, at St. 
Peter's parish, and the public is invited to attend. 

Tickets can be purchased in advance from Jaycees, at 
the State Bank, or at the door on Dec. 10. Prices are 32 for 
adults and $1 for children. « *..' 

.MARK AND AUDREY REEVES celebrated more than 
Thanksgiving last Thursday. Their beautiful new son 
arrived. Adam Reeves weighed 7 lb. 12 oz. and hear tell 
both mom and baby are home now! Congrats to you three! 




Letters from Santa 



GUESS WHO will be 160 
years old on Sunday?. The. 
state of Illinois. Happy 
birthday, big guy. 




LAST THURSDAY, Thanksgiving Day, was the first 
birthday for Timothy Henning,- who was born on Nov. 23, 
1977, at St. Therese hospital. 

' Timothy's parents, of course, are Wally and. Ginny 
Henning, and his big brother, Jeffrey, is now 5'/a. . 

Thanksgiving was more than a national holiday- for. the. 
Henning family. 

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TOMORROW, Nov. 30, to Carol 
.Badame! 

Maggie and Harry Lenny of Thompson's Restaurant 

-were out in Boston last week, visiting their daughter, 

-Andrea, who is a clinical instructor of pharmacy at 

^Northeastern University. '==. 

ZAndrea's husband, Richard T. Scheife, is an assistant 



/ 



clinical professor of neurology on the faculty of Tufts 
University school of Medicine in Boston. 

IT WAS JUST a year ago when Ron and Sophia Lech, 
and Betty Newer, opened "The Little Nut Hut and Sweet 
Shoppe" at 896, Main St. in Antioch. I'm going to keep 
them in mind when I do my Christmas shopping ... love ■) 
those delicious boxes of candy - and nuts — what a 
selection! 

I also have picked out someone's Christmas present at 
EJ's Camera ... but don't tell him! (That is a super place to 
shop for gifts for the photography enthusiast.) 



Opening December 11 



Antioch Savings and Loan Association will,, again 
sponsor the "Letters from Santa Claus" program. The 
program is designed to allow little boy t and girls to receive 
a letter from Santa with an official postmark from Santa 
Claus Indiana. 

Letters and envelopes are provided by Antioch Savings 
and Loan. They are addressed to the child and mailed in a. 
special mailbox in the Savings and Loan lobby. 

Letters are then sent to Santa Claus Indiana where they 
are processed through the official Santa Claus Post Office'' 
and receive the magic postmark. . 

A few days later the child will receive a letter from Santa 
Claus. ._,....'■. 

This program is open to the public as a community 
service by Antioch Savings & ISban. . - T 




Sandwich Shoppe 
&DeU 

436 Orchard Street, Antioch, Illinois 

Carry*Outs 

— Salads to Go — 

Hot & Cold Sandwiches 

Submarines! 

. . at least one*quarter pound of meat . 

• ^ on each Sandwich! 

Phone Ahead For Fast, Service 

312/3954811 

— Proprietors — 
Mary Schock & Marcia Zeliraki 



.aggie 

THOMPSON'S BAR &. RESTAURANT 

"ENJOY A RELAXING COCKTAIL WITH YOUR MEAL " 



933 MAIN STREET, ANTIOCH 386-0406 

EVENING SPECIALS 
NOV. 30 thru DEC. 5 

* 

THURSDAY 

Beef Stroganoff with Noddles . . .$2.25 

FRIDAY 

Fillet of Flounder . . . $2.50 

Poor Man's Lobster ,...:. .$2.75 

SATURDAY 

Frog Legs ... . . . ] ; . .$4.95 

B.B.Q. Baby Back-Ribs".-.-. ■. .$5.25 



A 



SUNDAY 

Roast Chicken with Dressing ...;.. .$3.95 

Roast Duck with orange sauce :$3.95 

■^-=1" (soup, salad & coffee) 

MONDAY -pH ffiHS 

Bratwurst w/ German potato salad . . .$2.25 



TUESDAY 

_ Breaded Pork Tenderloin .... . .$2.50 



W ^H S .»«U.H*^^^^^^^^^^^S^^^^^%^y^^»^^l^«^^^rf>^l 



Auditions 
at PAA&L 

Auditions for PM&L's " 
next production "Some- 
thing's Afoot," will be held 
Monday and Tuesday, D ec. 
1 1 and 12 from 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. at PM&L Theatre, 877 
Main St., Antioch. * 

Ken Smouse is directing 
Vhis musical, mystery, 
comedy and there are parts 
for four women and six men 
ranging in ages from. 20-60. 
Each character has a fea- 
tured role. 

Anyone interested in 
technical, and crew work is 
welcome to come. 

"■Something's Afoot'.'. 




Analysis 



By Sonia 




will be presented Feb. 
16. 17, 23 and 24. 



10, 




GZJ37 
&ZSB 



ARIES [March 21-Aprii 19] - Take up studies 
that enable you to broaden creative talents; you 
enjoy groups that allow you to share philosophies 
so get involved. You benefit now through travels, 
change surroundings. 




^IFJZ&P &JNET, A French' 
pfiCmt-o&t&r , invenT£p the 

FIRST "iMmwcSEWCE" test in ~± 

I905. IT WA£ THE &S6IHH\HC> OF 

IHOUffANPS OF 'TESTS MOW 

iNPiviPiML success \HJ66iH F' 



TAURUS [April 20-May 20J - Let otiiers con- 
tinue to take the initiative with joint business 
interests. Any changes made on your part requires 
careful consideration; do some investigating work. 

GEMINI [May. if-June 21] - Emphasis is 
now placed upon those around you so step aside 
and let others take .the lead. Strive for good 
relations with associates; not a time to argue about 
petty differences. 



SCORPIO [October. 23-November 21 J - You 
should devote attentions to occupational advance- 
ment; you present an impressive . picture to 
important people who can aid in your accomplish- 
ments now. 

» 

SAGITTARIUS [November 22-December 20] - 
A favorable week for projecting self-interests. You 
have the ability to influence others so emphasize 
your outgoing nature to best advantages. 

CAPRiCORN^December 21-January 20] - If 
you can work on ways of bettering your schedule 
through organization, bully for you. A quieter pace 
affords needed time for schedule, gaining insight on 
confusing issues which need resolving. 

AQUARIUS [January 2i-February 19) - Some 
friends and associates provide a good source of find 
ideas, enhance your own creative abilities. Concen- 

trate on improving conditions w ith those you enjoy 

being wit 



PISCES [February 20-March 20] - You profit 
through those well-organized moves. Occupational 
gains are abundant. Avoid arguing over petty 
matters as you're in the limelight now. 

BROUGHT TO YOU BY: 




' AsvAB/^wEP h^m s 

-KoCA-noVAC: APTITUDE &AiJ£M) f 
' %^$£CJE> OF TeSTS-TAJgEjtl 

^&i~ABOUT A MlU-»O>0 Hi s H • 
^^CHay-j&Tupewrs 6VEP-* VEAR ; 

■WHO VVAMT -TD'PikJC OUT~HOW ,- 
THEIK APK-ITIE^ J2tt.AlE.TO. 
SUCCESS (M HOWPPtP^ OFPtfrfKOJT 
CACtt-F-S JWTHt" U.-'-APMV;,- 




CANCER [June^22-July 21] - Schedule your 
week's activities so there's time for meeting 
obligations without a strain. Keep health in mind 
before over extending work duties. 



LEO [July 22-August 21] - Outlooft is good 
for speculating, working on new ventures. A 
favorable trend also for socializing and romance- 
Expect more activities this week, a stepped-up 
paceV 

VIRGO [August 22-September 22] -Deal in 
all matters carefully that affect your personal 
assets. Take careful stock of present, make 
improvements. Settle for a slower routine.^ 

T^LIBRA [September 23-October 22]?TSeek a 
contact with key people to. further your/gbod ideas 
and plans. Strengthen communication with associ- 
ates, an important week for advancement. 




\ 




JOHN TERESI 

Cheyrolet-Oldsmobile 

Route 173, 2 Blocks East of 83 

— ANTIOCH ;vf 

312-395-3600 f§ 

Where Oar Csstomers Send Their Friends 
Seffiee Is Bett And Cars Cot* Use 







■on 



\ 



Page 12 



/ 





THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 

Football team 
gives put its 
own honors 

The Antioch High School 
varsity football team has 
elected Greg Bodin its 
"most valuable - player" 
and Scott Schroeder team 
captain for the year. 

The honors were an- 
nounced by Coach Steve 
Wapon, " , 

Bodin was one of the 
team's leading ball-carriers 
and also a talented line- 
backer on defense. 

Schroeder was. an out- 
standing pass catcher- on 
-offenseand-also-starTed-as- 
a defensive back. 

The piayers : elected 
junior running back Mitch 
Case as their "most im- 
proved" teammate. 

Bodin was elected "out- 
standing back" and Mike 
O'Hara "outstanding line- 
man." O'Hara also was 
named homecoming king 
during the season. 



HEY KIDS!! . 

Haw Breakfast i 
With Santa 



(Continental Style) || 



White'* 9ce Oteant Vwttm 

Saturdays: Dec. 9th, 16th & 23rd 

*2PERCHII» 
CAU HOW FOR RESERVATIONS 

395-6331 

775 Main St., Antioch 






Turn your home into 

an energy conservation machine. 



With a heat pump. 



j> 



\t,. 




Instead ol burning scarce iuels, Ihe heal 
pump uses electricity to capture heat from - 
a limitless energy source. The sun. I 

lis ihe most practical, efficient heating 
and cooling system you can install today ■ 
And it's dramatically changing the way we 
use energy 



Tunis beat energy outside In 

and inside out. 

The same principle that makes the heat 
pump work Is already at work in your home 
inside your relngerator In lact.a heat 
pump is a lot like a refrigerator 

There's an indoor unit thai consists ol a 
coil and Ian There's an outdoor unit thai 
consists ol a coil, tan and compressor Piping 
connects them Inside the system, a 
relngerant circulates, "carrying" the heal 
trom inside out and outside in. 

Even on the cloudiest, coldest day ol 
winter, there's still solar hecrt In the air The 
relngerant In the outdoor coll absorbs this 
heat. Is compressed and pumped inside 
The heat comes out, keeping you warm 

In summer, the process is reversed Warm 
ainnside Ihe home Is blown over the 
indoor coil The refrigerant absorbs this 
heat, is pumped ouistde. then condensed 
The heat comes out. leaving you cool, 




The amazing heat pump is installed on 
the outside ol the home and is about the 
same size as a conventional central air 
conditioning unit, 

No matter how Ihe temperature;, 
changes, the heal pump automatically 
makes the necessary charges lo keep you 
comlortable. And Iheunit filters Ihe air and 
dehumidlties. loo 

Produces more energy than it 
uses. ' 

That's why the hoal pump is a real 
energy conservation machine in a typical 
Illinois winter, a heal pump provides gt 



least 1 .5 units ol heat energy lor every 
equivalent unll ot electricity it uses 

Unlike systems that merely use up energy 
to make heat, the heal pump uses . 
electncity lo produce more energy-than it 
uses It's this exlra energy bonus that makes 
the heal pump a smart investment 

The Initial cost is a little higher" But Ihe 
operallng cosl is lowerSo in the long run. 
the heat pump can help you save 

How; to get one. 

You can olten replace your present 
system with a heal pump Installing a rie'ji 
pump in a new home is even easier 

Either way. it's important to get a qua'lny 
produpt and have il properly installed an 
.serviced Check listing below 

For lurlher intormalion call your locd 
Commonweallh Edison oiiice and lalk 
one ol our markeling engineers about 
your plans 

Commonwealth 

Working for you. 





For names ofquaMfied heat pump installers in your area call: 



Air Ease 

Lxcelsior Slet'J furnace Co 
(3i2r.773.M0Q 

Scott Wood & Metal trie 
Kar,e Kendall 

A LaSalle Counties 
(312)890 5400 ^ 

Armstrong 

Emory C Perry Co 

(3l2).5o2.3700 

Scott Wood"* MelaL inc 

(815)933 7726 



Hard 

Central Furnace Supr.lv 1 

(JI2)355l220-.j 

Carrier^ 

Terhpera'lure Equip Corp 
(312)6814220 

Fiiodrich 
Chase Sopply Co" 
(312)785,0500 . 
Oil Heal Paris 

Fay River and West 
(815)965-8727 



General Electric 

(3I2)496l6200 Z 

Johnson 7 , 

Moore Supply Co- 
(31?) 235 4400 

Lennox' 
(312)593^2820 

Tappan~-= 

Tappan Dislnb Center 
(312)773 2270-^ 



Weslingfctouso 
G W Berkheirner Co 
f£312)5374.44ll 
G A. Larson Co 
Fox Rivorand West 
(815)963 p47| 

Rogers Supply Co- 
Gruncly, Kankakee- 
- 8t Livingston Coundes 
(217) 367-6488 



Willlams;-i 

,G W. BerkhVimer &i 

n 1 2f3 7.1 4411 

Williamson: 

Witliamson Distrit 
(312)625 2500 

York 

-York Division- '~ z 

(312) 279 0Q50 
"Arir Equipment Inc 

Far River and West 

(815) 723-9JI L 



Adafciwt towr 



By LINDA WALKER 

Did you have a nice Thanksgiving? I did but, as usual, 1 
stuffed myself instead of the turkey. , 

IF YOU'RE LOOKING for a unique gift idea, visit 
Eberle's Apiary just north of Antioch on highway 83. 

Their fine selection of honey products tempt the taste 
buds, and you don't have to worry about the fit. 

Bev Eberle will help you select your favorites for 
custom-made g ift boxes. It's a great g ift idea from Mother 
Nature. 

THE STORES WILL begin their Christmas hours next 
Monday. That means you, can shop .Monday through 
Friday until 9 p.m. or during the day Saturday and 
Sunday. - • 

Any working woman (or man for that matter) will 
appreciate those hours. Time becomes very valuable and 
fleeting as Christmas nears. 

MARK AND AUDREY Reeves are the hdppy parents of 
a little boy. See Annie Mae for more information. 
" Audrey is ^orie = of . the owners of Guys . & Dolls 
Hairdressers and,, for the past several yvceks, has been 
unable to work for obvious reasons. " 

My congratuIatiQrjs to the parents, and a reminder .to 
Audrey that she lost our bet. 

\ "ANDROCLES AND the Lion," PM&L's next play, 
opens Saturday, Dec. 2 You can see the delightful comedy 
by calling 395-3055^ for reservations^ % *= 

Pat Sershon insures me you'll love it._ 

* I HAVE NEVER seen so many poinsettias as those in 
full bloom at Koeune's Greenhouse, on Route 45; 

Gene would like everyone to see his display and is 
holding an open house 'Friday, Saturday and Sunday for 
just that purpose. ~\ 

If you get time; try to stop by. I guarantee that it will put 
you in a festive mood. 

WHAT A SHAME merchants must spend hundreds j>f 
| dollars annually trying to prevent the increasing" rise of 
.theft and vandalism. 

Too bad people don't stop toYealize that it is one of the 
major-causes for high prices. 

Don't forget ... in the end,; you pay for shoplifting. 




c 



Noah' Young ran a mile in 8 minutes 30 seconds carry- 
ing a 150-pound man on his back. Young weighed 198 
pounds. He made the run on April 12, 1915, at Melbourne 
Australia,' 




NOW."- tw £jT 
OpenSuhrH]BlIJ'e& 




wmm?§ 




(312) 395-1991 

391'/, Lake St. 

Antioch IIJ. 

(Upstairs) 








Future Sequoits get 
first basketball win 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



Page 13 



/■ 



The Antioch sophomore basketball team, opening. the 
season in the tough Barrington tournament, suffered 
losses to Barrington and Libertyville before rebounding 
against the Elgin-Larkin sophs to notch the season's first 
win.- 

In the tournament's opening game, host Harrington 
jumped to an 8-poiht halftime lead at 28-20. 

The Broncos then took advantage of numerous defensive 
mistakes in the second half to win going away, 62-4Sr^ 

Dan Maras and John Eckert led the scoring for 'Antioch, 
while Eckert and Pete Weber rebounded well against the 
taller. Broncos. . 

IN FRIDAY'S GAME against Libertyville, Maras and 
John Ploss combined for 20 points in the first half to give 
Antioch a 28-27 halftime lead. However, Libertyville's 
pressing defense kept the Sequoits off balance throughout 
most of the second half, as the Wildcats went on to a 59-50 
win. 

Maras" finished"with"26^pbihtsT, including 10 of 11 shots 
from the free throw line, to lead all scorers for the game. 

THE DETERMINED Antioch sophs finally put together 
two good halves against Elgin-Larkin on Saturday. 
. Balanced scoring and a much-improved defense gave 
Antich a 23-18 halftime edge, a lead they never 
relinquished. J 7 '- 

Led by the outside shooting of Tim Koesser and the 





SEQUOIT WRESTLER Jim Fasnacht makes 
a Mundelein opponent feel like a pretzel. 
Fasnacht, a 126-pounder, reached the semi- 



finals of the talent-packed Rich South 
tournament last weekend. (Paul Maplethorpe 
photo.) 




Outlook super for wrestlers 



rebounding of Maras, the Sequoits crushed Larkin in the 
second half to record a solid 53-29 victory. 

Koesser led all scorers with 22 points, followed by Gary 
Volling with 9 and Ploss with 8 points. "It was really the 
team defense that was the key in this win," according to 
Coach Don Zeman. "Antioch limited Elgin to only 11 
points in the second half." . 

On Friday the Sequoits travel to Fox Lake for an 
important conference matchup against the Grant 
Bulldogs. The sophomore game begins at 6:30, followed 
by tlje varsity contest at 8 p.m. 



MR. ARNOLD'S COIFFURES 

"Men's & Women's 

Hairstyling 
& Permanent Waving 

By Mr. Arnold 
& Kris Stahl 




PHONE 
395-5 123 



BY APPOINTMENT 
Tues. & Wed., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
Thurs. & Fri., 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
Sat.. 8 a.m. to :t p.m. 
Closed Monday 



The Antioch wrestling program is living up to the 
expectations of recent years. o 

The work of Coach Ted DcRousse and his colleagues, 
plus the ability of their wrestlers, paid off last week when 
the high school varsity placed second in the 32-team Rich 
South tournament. zz 

Antioch lost the championship by only 2Vi points in 
what" DcRousse called "the state's largest and most 
prestigious invitational wrestling tournament. — 

-"THIS IS THE BEST Antioch had done in the four years 

^weJiayeJbeen in this tournament," DeRousse said. 4'It 

indicates an outstanding; season ahead for the Sequoits.'.' 

Antioch showed team balance as it did not crown an 
individual champion, but all 12 wrestlers won at least one 
match. 7 

Glen Kaht, 138, was Antioch's highest finisher as he 
placed second. 

Jon, 105, and Marvin Gibson, 132, each placed third and - 
MikeO'Hara, 185, placed fourth. y --gE 

Other point-getters for Antioch were Glen McCollum, 
98, who won three matches, too by fall; Dan Larsen, who 
placed third in the consolation bracket; Tim Haviland, 1 19, : 
fourth in the consolation bracket; Jim Fasnacht, 126, who 
reached the semifinals; Dave Bogaerts, 145, who won two 



matches; Kirk Sarmont, 155,= and; Dave Asohbacher, who 
won one match, and Ted Bessette, who won three matches . 
at heavyweight. 

WEDNESDAY, BEFORE Thanksgiving, the Sequoits 
entertained Mundelein and Zion on the home mats. 

Against Zion, Antioch scored a rare 63-0 shutout. 

"It is almost impossible to beat another team in 
wrestling defeating all 12 of their individuals," said 
DcRousse. 

"In fact, it was such a surprise that 1 think it set us up. 
for Mundelein. We were basking in the light of our shutout 
and thinking about the upcoming tournament when 
Mundelein upset us 25-19. 

."lt-'s unfortunate that we lost, for 1 think, many of the 
wrestlers were already thinking of an undefeated dual 
meet season. But they are a mature group of athletes and 
they realize that, in wrestling,- tournaments are what 
count. • jl-P 

J "I think they realize after finishing second in the Rich 
South tournament .that we have a team with outstanding 

potential. 

"Our schedule is one of the toughest- in the state of 
Illinois and will .prepare us for the conference and state 
tournament at the end of the year." 



fcmas (gards 



20 percent Discount to Senior 
Citizens on Tues.; Wed. & Thurs. 

Regular barber service as usual iif 
Radke's Barber Shop. 

912 Main St., Antioch 




Hours: 

Mondayiihru Saurday 

iiualily parts * workmanship guaranteed^ re**onM*^~ 

ZwHhjnojhtejg!' ftowi* ^s. 






THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY 



NOVEMBER 29; 1978 



Page 14 THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY M uvaviD C n«, .-« 

Early-season showdown: Antioch vs. Grant 



Soquoif basketball team 





The conference basketball season opens Friday night, 8 
o'clock, for Antioch's varsity and the Sequoits have their 
work cut out for them. 

They travel to Fox Lake to face the Northwest Suburban 
favorite. Grant's Bulldogs. - _ 

The Bulldogs put up a. good fight last Saturday before 
losing ,'68-57 to Rockfofd East, fourth in the state last 
: season— — J..__ _. — „^ . - 

ANTIOCH, MEANWHILE, got off to a rocky, start in the 
rough Barrington Thanksgiving tournament — losing all 
three games. 

Barrington, another state power, crushed, the Sequoits 
85-62 -on Wednesday, Elgin-Larkin outdueled them 71-64 
_on Friday anrithan, on Saturday, the Seq uoits shot poorly 
and lost 65-47 to Libertyviite; 

Against Libertyville they hit on a mere 14 of their 64 
shots for a mere 22 percent. 

"Most of our players were in their first varsity games," 
explained coach Roger Andrews. "We gained much- 
needed experience in the, tournament. It isn't much fun 
losing all three games, but the squad worked hard and 
hustled. With a couple of breaks and good'shooting in the 
last game, we could have won two of the three contests." 

THREE ANTIOCH STARTERS "really showed some 
signs of doing a good job," Andrews said. Dave Gutowski, 
a guard, and Pete Ploss and Chris Oddsen, in the middle of 
the offense, were the Sequoits he singled out. 

"We feel the team is going to mature and be a fine ball 
club before the season is over," the coach added. 
* Regarding Friday's trip to^Grant, Andrews said: 

"I am sure it will be a great Antioch-Grant game.. The 
winner- will be in a very favorable position j.n the 
conference race." 

A HIGHLIGHT FOR Antioch in i\s opener againsti 
T Barrington was the 25-point shooting performance of Scott 
Gallagher. He hit on 10 of 15 field goal attempts and five of 
eight.frcc throws. 

Gutowski contributed 14 points while Ploss <ind Rob 
Nauman each had eight. -_, =- 

Against Elgin Larkin, Gutowski led with 14. points."^ 
i R()ger. : Korjehck and Gallagher each scored 13 and. Ploss 
1 had! 2. 

Then, against Lihurtyville, it was Ploss leading the way 
with 18 points - wjiilcjGutowski contributed 10 and Oddsen 
nine-. i ' 



IN GRANT'S LOSS to Rock ford 'East. Jon MjJIcr [led the 
Bulldog offense. with 24 points. He will be tl\c Grant player- 
to watch in Friday night's conference opener. . 

WHEN HE WAS TOLD that other coaches were picking 
his Grnt Bulldogs" to win the conference championship, 
Tom Maple smiled and admitted: 

"Very unofficially, I would have to agree." 
All_five of Grant's returning lettermen were starters last 
season,' plus the varsity now includes nine, juniors' who 
were members of what Maple calls "a super sophomore 
team. 1 ' 

"Coached by Fritz Kazlausky, they were 21-3_overall 
"and 16-0 to win the conference sophomore championship," 
Maple said". . 

THE FIVE LETTERMEN are led by Jon Miller, a 6-2 
forward who was all-conference as a junior last season. He 




LAKE PERCH FILLETS $Q§ 9 



POORMAN'S 
LOBSTER 



21 SHRIMP DINNER 




DINNER N 



NEW STORE HOURS ^ 

%ri. -Thuri ^10-6:30 Friday 10-8:00 
Saturday 10-5:30 Sunday Closed 




averaged 14 points a game, shooting 54 percent from the 
field. 



SALE GOOD THRU DEC. 2, 1978 



ft 




.STOP IN AND CHECK OUT 
OUR COMPLETE 
j LINtOFFHEW FISH. 

We Reserve The Right To 
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FOR 
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\, 



3Jon~Va good leaper and a hard competitor, Maple 
said. "The other four lettermen are all capable scorers and 
Drcttv well-rounded players." _ >_- - 

They give Grant a team with fairly good size: 6-3 Keith 




Kelly, 6-1 Mike Bosman; 6-3 Terry Tylkowski and 6-4 
Kevin Dagnan. . ' ■ , . ' . t . 

Kelly co-starred with the 200-pound Miller in Grant s 
footbatlbackfield this fall. 

Keith Kelly, incidentally, is the third of three brothers 
who have starred for Grant in both football and basketball 
in recent years. Kevin Kelly was a standout for the 
Bulldogsin 1975 and *76 while Kerry Kelly was a member 
of Maple's 1976-77 conference championship team. 

MAPLE THINKS three other teams "have a very 
legitimate shot at winning" the conference title. 

"Based on lettermen; plus height, tradition, coaching 
and everything else, Stevenson, Wauconda and Warren 
are contenders," he said. "Like us, they all have key 
lettermen back." 

"Lake, Zurich is a darkhorse," Maple added, ''and I 
have yet to see an Antioch team that isn't representative."^ 

"We wilt find out before Christmas whether we're true - 
contenders or not, because we play Antioch, Stevenson, 
and Warren to open our conference schedule," Maple 
said. 

4 Sequoits 

win all-state . 
mention 

. Four Antioch High 
School football players last 
week received honorable 
mention on the Chicago 
Sun-Times' all-statjf team. 
They were. Dave Asch- 
bachcr, 175-pound guard; 
Mike Q'Hara, 193-pound 
tackle; Scott Schroeder, 174" 
pound end and, defensive^ 

"back, and Andy Dziki; 16V 
pound linebacker. 

ALL 4 OF THE Antioch^ 
stars are seniors. 

The four Sequoits, who; 
helped their team finish the = 
season with three consecu- 
tive thrilling ^victories, pre- 
viously were named to the 
= all-Northwest Suburban 
Conference team. 




OF SPORTS 



The Rock Socks 



SHOWING HUSTLE in last week's Barrington tournament was Dave 
Gutowski, Antioch. High School basketball letterman.-He scored 37 
pointsin the three games. 




SAVE ON A DOZEN 

COLOR REPRINTS 

Send photos with all those 
i^ very special Christmas cards. 



IS 

IE 



Coupon must accompany order. 

Color Reprints 

P 12 for $1.89 

I FROM YOUR COLOR NEGATIVES I 

|. Limit one order por coupon. Kodak oi^ | 

compatible, negatives. ■ 

Jw'ALID^NOV 20 THRU DEC 9; 1978 



I 
I 
I 
I 




You can watch Rocky 
Marciaho defeat Jersey Joe 
Walcott in what has. been 
called the Greatest Heavy- 
weight; Title Fight of All 
Time— the heavyweight 
championship of 1952— on 
home movies. A free list of 
championship fight films in 
super 8mm and 16mm t as 
The first Ford automobile had well as other sports films, 
to wait over an hour for its is available by wtritirTg 
first test run, since it was to Ring Classics, S.N., 
built in a shed, and'was wider 35 Afanderbilt Parkway^ 
Jthan the shed do o r.Hauppauge, N.Y. 11787. 





<£o4e 



395-0800 



939 Main St., Antioch, 





■^^^^#m%^^^^i 



Grass Lake Road 
Route,! - Box 723- 
JVntioch, Illinois 6fj002 

Hours: 
]! Monf-Fri.7::j(')lo5;Ii(J 
Saturday 7:30 lo l^;oo 



•i ■■ 



Complete line of 
_ materials for the 
Professional or Do-it-yourselfer 




•■ 



= i 






THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER W, 1978 



* • 



Page 15 



t 



6-4 

)t's 

ers 
sail 
the 
ber 

ery 

ing 
ren 
key 

d I 

e." 

rue" 

;oh, 

iple 



f 

The Antioch News 




ligh 
last 
able 
:ago 
lm . 
sch- 
ard; 
>und 
174 
sive 
167- 



ioch 



who 



EASY TO ENTER 

Simply predict the winner 

and the point-spread in the' 
"Game of the Week" and 
the tie-breaker. 




Entries must be received 
|>ridffto 5 p.m^qn Fri 




Ifliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



RSI 



2j SIS Cash from Antioch Counseling 
S Services 





= $10 Gift Certificate from BJ Rush 
5 i Studio 




ill 





the 
;cu- 
pre- 

ban 



SPONSORED BY! THE FOLLOWING MERCHANTS: 



Z * $5 Gift Certificate from Ben Franklin 

fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiF; 





ANTIOCH 
SAVINGS 

& loan association. 

•425 Lake Street 
Antioch, Illinois 60002 
312 395-3030 



CHARLES M. CERMAK 



LAKES LICEHSE SERVICE 

B^?0TLiA;KE5ST R^ET 'ti 



• Prtfnipt pick-up serviced 
*Title and license transfers. 
tStOo! of state transfers 

395-1136 DICK WITT 




T7J966- Victoria StreeP 
395-4111 




^undleliphtl 
JofAnUoch 




lllRt. 173, P.O. Box 92 
Antioch, 111, 60002 
395-7722 




Sine* 1937 



PEDERSEH BROS. IMP. 



GMC 



395 3700 Rte. 173&45 

— — AntiochHIIinois 1 

MP Mawey Ferguson TRUCKS 

When it comes to tractors & = trucks, 
trust a tractor & truck man. .=- 



Andre's 
Steak House 



Bob's Septic 

£ Cement Service 

ROBERT E. LASCO, OWNER 
Phone (312 \ 395 1985 




httenl ^ M 

gEMBREECQ 

LUMBER MILLWORK 



474 Orchard St. - Antioch Shopping Plaza 
ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 60002 



Never a Bum Steer 

Luncheon Served Daily 

KflURUKUttUniH '--IMflHMW 

II. 12. U allt North ol HchaoBd-. 




00 









Jtf J 


■ 


B 




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- ---=- 9 



Main St., Antioch 
395-6212 



ANTIOCH 
5CGUNSELING SERVICES 

Psychological counseling 
for children and families. 

800N.:MainSt„Aiitjoclv 



OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM 

"Game bfjhe Week" 

Antioch at XS-rant 




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Antioch, Illinois 



pick 




STANLEYS 

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_ _ ; ; to win by 

"Tic-BreakcrA' 

Arvtioch Sop^Osp^ant Sp 

...'.' to win by.-. .'..». 



points. 




points. 



NAME 



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Phone 395-3313 






ANTIOCH ILL 




ADDRESS 



Hlisll^tJidio 

HouseW Distinctive Photography 

141 T Cher HUaner Antioch 



CITY 



PHONE 
on ly Ventry per person , 



Bring or mall toThe^ Antioch News. P.O. Box S 
^950 Main Si.), Antioch, I L 60002 «s 



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Page 16 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



LEGAL ') 

ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR PUBLICATION 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1978 
GRASS LAKE SCHOOL DISTR. #36 
RT. 1, BOX 716, ANTIOCH, ILLINOIS 60002 
Size of District in Square Miles 5.2, Number of Attendance 
Centers I, Number of Full-time Certificated Employees 
.16, Numbers of Part-time Certificated Employees 3, 
Number of Full-time Non-Certificated Employees 7, 
Number of Part-time Non-,certificated Employees 4. . 
Average Daily Attendance 273.96, Average Daily Mem- 
bership 284.92. Number of Pupils Enrolled Per Grade: 
Kindergarten 36, First 34, Second 32. Third 27. Fourth 30. 
Fifth 36. Sixth 34. Seventh 32, Eighth 50, Special 6, Total 
Elementary 317. Total-in. District 317. 
Tax Rate bv Fund (in %): 

Educational 61.64%, Operations, Bldg.. and Maintenance 
10.^4%. Bond and Interest 11.08%, Rent N/A%. - Working 
Cash 2.0%. Transportation 4.96%, Municipal Retirement 
6.87%, Capital Improvements N/A%, Fire Prevention and 
Safety N/A%. Tort Immunity 3.02%. District Assessed 
. Valuation 59.684,740;. Assessed Valuation Per A.D.A. 
Pupil S35.350.92, Assessed Valuation Per A.D.M. Pupil 

— S33TWim ~ ~ — — J 

Total Bonded Indebtedness June 30, 1978 $160,000.00. 
Percent of Bonding Power Obligated Currently 8.5%. 
Value of Capital Assets: Land S48.950.57. Basis of. 
Valuation Used Audit; guildings 5449,579.20, Basis of 
Valuation Used Audit; Equipment $95,062.51. Basis of 
Valuation .Used Audit. 

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS AT.27.50 PER DAY 
A. Myers, J. Swank, M. Bicanic, P. Kenyon, L. Bricrton. 
L. Osborne, J. Taguc, I, Lang. M. ReCupido, J. Peters, G, 



Banek, B. Holtzihger. H. Petty, C. Aubuchon, D. Clauson, 

W. Andreas. - nrn . AW «n, 

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL 

: Salary Range Less Than $5,000: R. Lefcourt D Foss 

Salary Range $5000 - $9,999: M. Chnstman, B. Com. D. 
Eiserman, J. Haley, P. Small, S. Kostiuk. D. Studee 

Salary Range $10,000 -$14,999: J. Carmody, P. Fier P. 
Friedrick, J. Larson, M. Olson. M. Riccip, E : Schroeder. 
K. Simon, R. VanDoran, E. Paulausky. 
Salary Range $15.000-$19,999: R. McKenzie, 
Salary Range$20.000 and Over: A. Palucci. 
GROSS PAYMENT FOR 
NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL 
Salary Range Less Than $5,000: W. Nauman, C. Williams, 
M. Anderson, fcsikbrski, R. Killips, S. Gilday, M. 
Krieger, F. Calonder, C. Mattson, B. Vos, J. Jendryczka, 
M. Brown, L. Koenig, R. Wells, L. Thompson. J. Kelly,, J. 

Thinger. 

Salary Range $5,000-59,999: D. Bond. B. Kecfer, K. 

Langcr, H. Nolan. 

LIST THE PERSON, FIRM, OR CORPORATION IN THE 

AGGREGATE PAID $100 OR MORE. THESE ARE 

PAYMENTS IN ADDITION TO PREVIOUSLY LISTED 

_WAGES_OR.SALARIES. 



A & B Printing $594.80; A&P Tea Co.. $448.98; Ace 
Hardware S2.105. 12; Ace Roofing $450.00; Adams & 
Borrc $1:240.00; Adesko Electric S301.85;Aldridge Elec- 
tric $156.25; Anderson's Heating $602.14; Ann Arbor 
'Publishers $112.53; Antioch Grade . School $116.74; 
Antioch School Distr. #34 $91*5.75; Antioch News $292:80; 
Area Glass & Mirror $383.31; Atlantic Richfield $1_.484.44; 
Bccklcy Cardy $920.77; Carey Electric $1,064.73; Carroll 
Seating $6,167.92; Central West S333.0O; Commonwealth 
Edison $5,955.67; Country Companies $4,856.41; Demco 



Educational Corp. $327.34; Dependable Pest Control 
$168 00; Developmental Learning Material $125.68; 
Diamond Chemical $3,042.1 1; Educational Reading 
$325.42; Ernstmeyer Plumbing $180.72; Fuqua & Winter 
Attornies $400.00; G.A. Guidance $442.50; Gaylord Bros. . 
$208.90; Ginn & Co. $353.03; Grass Lake Lumber $234.31; 
Grays Distributors $143.80; Harcourt Brace $172.21; 
Harper Row Publishers $367.92; H.O.D. Disposal Service 
$915.00; Hoover Well Service $1,240.00; Howards Lock-, 
smith $316.25; Illinois Association of School Boards 
$525.00; Illinois Bell Telephone $2,034.80; Inlander 
Brothers $945.00; Kappus Bread Co. $604,52; Laidlaw 
Brothers $3,575.00; Lake-Cook Farm Supply $5,332.35; 
Langan & Haeger $177.00; Lasco Sanitary Service $480.00; 
Latta'& Son $1,603.45; McGraw Hill $148.35; Mariondale 
Farms $4,020:89; Means Service Center $121.46; Merrill 
Publishers $424.49; Modern" Curriculum Press $244.00; 
New Dimensions $501.38; Nor Mai International $219.63; 
Northern Illinois Gas $6,794.75; Olson Implement $476.54; 
Palmer Company $219.94; P.B. Enterprises $103.50; 
Pease Ford $172.18; Peg Board Systems $155.68; Peterson 
& Larsen $157.16; Railton $1, 540.95;. Ravenswood Camp 
$725.00; Rawles & Katz . Ltd. $320.00; Ritzcnthaler 
$7,086.06; Ross Bus Sales $780.92; Ryser Bros. $136.70; 
Scholastic Book Service $7 77.30; School Sound Systems 
$566.00; Science Research Associates $947:22 r~ Scot t— 
Foresman $663.56; SEDOL $18,966.71; Simplex Recorders 
$138.lO:Staubcr, Edward $195.00; thclen Sand & Gravel 
$1 17.42;. Tippett Inc. $125.33; Town & Country $203.40; ' 
Troll Association $125.00; Turner Subscriptions $283.54; 
United Audio Visual $560.75; Up Right Inc. $1,279.10; 
Vaughn's Auto Service $264.71; Victor Corp. $124.50; 
Wayne's Union 76 $240.00; Westminister $560.00; 
Wolverine Sports $306.06; Xerox Corp. $1,043.80; Young 
Corp. $167.57. 



STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ARISING FROM CASH TRANSACTIONS/STATEMENT OF POSITION June 30, 1978 



ASSETS 

Cash: K^ 

Petty Cash . 

Imprest Fund 

Cash in Banks 

Investments -;! ^ 

Other Assets-construction progress 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 

Fund Balances 



Total Liabilities and Fund Balances 



Educational 



50.00 

500.00 

(14,216.35) 

97,804.79 

' 84,138.44 

84,138.44 
.84,138.44 



Operations, Bldg. 
and Maintenance 



(4,424.90) 
6,772.50 

^2.347.60 

^2^347^60 = 
27347,60^ 



Bond and 
Interest 



34.50 
22,620.10 

22,654.60 

22,654.60 
■ 22,654.60 



Trans- 
portation 



2,580.88 
13,212.39. 

15,793.27 

15,793.27 

15,793.27 



Municipal 
Retirement 



13,349.16- 
3,214.72 

16,563.88 



16,563.88 
16,563.88 



Site and 

Construction 



16,532.91 
166,497.29 

29,577.26 
212,607.46 

212,607.46 
.212,607.46 



Working 
Cash 



3,703.52 
38,012.17 

41,715.69 

41,715.69 
41.715.69 



. r 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS/REVENUES AND TRANSFERS 



RECEIPTS/REVENUES AND TRANSFERS 

Taxes- 157,796.25 

Governmental Divisions: 
S( atc ^ 212,866.05 

Interest on Investments : 929.19 

Payments from other' Districts^: 
Other Revenue 



Student and Community Services: 
Lunch Program =5= 
TOTAL RECEIPrS/REVENUES 
AND TRANSFERS 



11,454.90 
23,814.38 
406,860.77 



261134.15 

246.34 
1.276.75 

27,657.24 




20,394.97 
635.13 



21,030.10 



13,411.73 

12,610.88 

259.99 

2,779.94 



29,062.54 



18.679.47 
; ^229.53 



9,485.44- 



18,909.00 



9,485.44 



5,128.31 

j 

700.24' 



5,828.55 





DISBURSEMENTS/EXPENDITURES 
AND TRANSFERS" 



Administration ^ 

Instruction 

Health 

Operation 

Maintenance 

Fixed Charges 

Student and Community Services: 
Athletic Program 
Textbooks 
Lunch Program ] 
Capital Outlay 
Bond Principal RctircdB 
T O T A L D I S B U R SE ME N T S / E X 

PENDITURES AND TRANSFERS 

Excess (Deficiency) of Receipts/Revenues 
and Transfers Over Disbursement/^ 
Expenditures and Transfers " 



Beginning Fund Bahnce^Juiyip, \97J^ 
Add: Excess or ReceTpIs/ Re venues and 
Transfers over D|sburTernejiTstExl 
penditures and Trinsfbrs:^ 
Total (Fund Bala^and^d|t]ons)| 
Deduct: Excess of Disb^sements/Excf 
penditurcs and TransfjersrgWrERi*ce]pls>; 
Revenues and Transfers: 

Ending Fund Balance. June 30. 1978 



STATEMENT OF DISBURSEMENTS/EXPENDITURES AND TRANSFERS 



50.331 .59 
227.569.99 

42,605.41 

16,393.57 

3,442v26 

2,433.96 

18.642.45 

6,819.76 

368,238.99 

38.621.78 



45.516"* 66 



38.621.78 
84,138:44 



84J38.44 




7.900.22 
4,501.68 . 
1 ,266.00 



9.212.50 



V 232.00 

16,041.40 

1,875.78 

1 .329.5 1 




3,258.14 


16.926.04 




15,000.00 
24,212.50 

3.182.40) 



19,478.69 



9.583.85 



ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 




(8.383.60) 



10,731:20 
27347.60 



2,347.60 



25,837.00 



25.837.00 



3,182.40 
— 22,654.60 



6,209.42 



9,583.85 
15,793.27 



15.793.27 



10,553.39 




,485.44 



5,828.55 



8,208:27! 



8f355i6P 
16,563.88 



I6,S63;88 




203.122.02 



9.485.44 
212,607.46 



35,887.14 



5,828.55 
41.715.69 



:->'l ^^_- ~- =- 



212.607.46 41.715.69 

November 29,1.9.78" 






'.' . I 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



Pago 17 




mg - 





ANTOOCH SHEET 
METAL, INC. 



Rtes. 
59 & 173 

395-4040 






HEATING& 

AIRcCONDITIOWING 

SALES & SERVICE 



AN T I O C H 




FOR CHRISTMAS 



Mtm. vThursI 10 a.m. loOp.m, 
Fn.jj)a.mJo8 p.m. 
Sal79a.ni;ro3p.m., 

395-6500 

AMPLE FREE PARKING IN REAR 

; 090 Main SL, Ant ioch 



giiimMiiiimimiiiiiiiiiimtiiiiiiiiiimiuj 

I clastic :-; J 

| Secretarial | 

| Fast, Accurate | 

| Reasonably Priced | 

| p.o; goxi3i I 

Antioch, 111. 3 

! 395-6713 j 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiHR 




* Vanities 

* P/umb/ng Needs 

* Mansfield Toilets 



RHours: Mon.-Fri. 8-5; Sat. 8-12 noon? Closed Sun 
■ ! 



3 ■" _>_" 



Youth bowling 



YOUTH BOWLING 
NOVEMBER 18, 1978 

Junior A Boys: High 
Scries, Mark Maglio, 468; 
High Game, John Silianoff, 
.188. 

Junior B Boys: High- 



Series, David Cooper, 479; 
High Game., David Cooper, 
199. 

Junior/Major Boys: High 
Series, John Horsch; 538;' 
High Game, John Horsch, 
192. 



National 
Series, Jeff 
High Game, 
178. 

American 
Series, Greg 
High Game, 
143— . 

Bantam 
; Series, Mike 



Boys; High 
Peterson, 428; 
Larry Rodgers, 

Boys: High 
McAfee, 333; 
Greg McAfee, 



Boys: High 
Doolittle, 351;^ 



High Game, Eric Olsen, 
139. 

Junior A Girls: High 
Series, Debby Hucker, 404; 
High Game, Jenny Knour- 
ek, 156. 

Junior B Girls: High 
Series, Donna Skidmore, 
458; High Game, Ann Ivy, 
179. -^! 



One of the Best Energy Savers of AIITnm! ( 




j>s*' c - 




^ 



HOLDS' IN 
HEAT! 



KEEPS OUT 
COLD! 



^ LCT ■ 
IK FOR YOU f 

'Make Your Own Storm Windows, 
Storm Doors, Porch Enclosures! 



rWS^* WORK FOR YOU! \ 




Saves 
Fuel! 



ft p EASY ANYONE CAN DO-4T1 

CUT FLEX-O-GLASS TO SIZE "T 
AND TACK OVER SCREENS \ 
OR WINDOW OPENINGSI _U 
ONLY 

CyiA Run. ft. 
jm-V 36" Wide 



COSTS SO LITTLE 
ANYONE 
. CAN AFFORD m A - 2> . 48 „ W[d , hs 

WARP BROS. Chicago 60651 ffi"itfdS H SiSi C Stofi 



Junior/'Major Girls: High 
iSeries, Diane Pahlke, 446; 
High Game, Diane Pahlke, 
168 and Chris Veltum, 168. 
National Girls: High 
Series, Sharon Risch, 373; 
High Game, Julianne Coyle 
137. 

American Girls: High, 
Series, Renee Hallwas, 
391; High Game, Renee 
Hallwas, 146: 

Bantam Girls: High 
Scries. Beth Dubek, 309; 
High GamOBeth Dubek.-: 
125. 

Bowlers earning awards 
from the Uunoi State BPA: 
Donna Skidmore 458 series; 




John Silianoff 188 high 
game; Larry Rodgers 178 
high game; first 100 game 
certificates: DerryH Rich- 
tcr 108 and Scott Smolar- 
chuklio. 



mm 



HOMEMTE 



m 



FREE Qt. Bar & Chain Oil 

6 Pack Motor Oil Mix 



Ace Hardware 

Rt.59&Rt.l73 

Antioch, 111. 60002 

395-0426 

Antioch True Value . 
gplo-MaihSt.: 
Antioch. 111. 60002 
^: 395-4200 

Effinger'siHardware 

122Grahd AveV 
LakeVilla,. 111^60046 
7^^356-2840^ 

Grayslake True Value 
170 Center 
Grayslake, 111. 
-; 223-8117 



GurrTce True Value 
4806 Grand Ave. 

Gurnee.Jll. 
336-0101 

Lake Villa Lumber & 

Coal Co. 
• 170 Cedar Ave; 
Lake Villa. Ill- 60046 

. 356-2431 

bindenhurst True Value 
2080 E7Grand Ave-— 
bindenhurst, III. 60046 

356-3344 



Hook's Lumber Co. 

'31 S.Seymour Ave. 

Grayslake, III. 

223-8421 

Haddock Lake True Value 
Rt.50 ■ 
Paddock Lake, Wis. 
414-843-2422' ' 

Trip Lumber Co. 
j40W^Railroad 
Round Lake, 111. 
546-2142- 



■ True Value Hardware 
9902 Main St. 
Richmond, 111. 60071 
-815-678-3201 

Long Lake Lumber Co. 
Long Lake Station 
Ingleside, 111. 
' 546-1223 

Fox 1 Lake True Value 

Hardware & Lumber Co. 

M99 Christopher Way / 

Fox Lake, 111- 

587-6322 



WITH PURCHASE 

OF ANY 
NEW 




Many .models JSLsizes 
to choose from. 



Perfect f6r gift giving 

R-MAL 





INTERNATIONAL INCORPORATES) 

^~ - Route 1 73 and Deep Lake Road^- 

(312)395-4242 



I 




Page 18 



THE ANTfOCH NEWS 



Classified Ads 

RATES: First 15 words 51 - Additional 
words 5c each. Ad deadline: Monday, 
afternoon. 952 Main St., Antioch, Illinois 
6000^. 395-5755 



For Sale 



For Rent 



"THS . COURTYARD 

ANTIQUES, 384* j Lake St. v - 
.Antioch, '111. Hours:* By 

appointment .or chance. 

395-09C3 or 395-2766. 

Appraisals. 



PUBLIC AUCTIONS 
WEEKLY 

Wednesday; 10 a.m. 
Friday, 7 p.m. 




Breezy Hill Farm 

Wis. Hwy. 50 & B: 9 mi: 

No. of Antioch on 83 

Consignments Welcomed 

(414)527-4448 



MNTED 



ANTIQUES - ESTATES^ 
HOUSEHOLDS or what- 
ever for Direct Purchase or 

Auction Consignments. 

UNIQUE ANTIQUES LTD. 
(414)537-4448 



2 bedrm. apt. All utilities 
included except elec. Heat 
furnished. No pets. $250.00. 
356-5654. 



RENT A CONDOMINIUM 
IN FLORIDA. St. Peters- 
burg Beach. Ideal for 2 
couples. 2 bedrooms, 2 
private baths, living room, 
■trnirng-roomr-^verlooki ng- 
Boca Ciega Bay. Swim- 
ming, tennis, million dollar' 
clubhouse. Security con- 
trolled. Call 395-0814. 



Reaf Estate 

5 room, 2 bedroom cedar 
sided ranch in Ingleside. 3 
lots, double pane windows, 
new carpeting, many 
mature trees, fireplace, 
boat house (needs siding). 
Vi block off Long Lake. Will 
divide, possible contract 
sale. 542,900. Call. (815) 
,385-0631. . 22c 



Great 3 bedroom affordable home with paneled 
living room. Large eat-in kitchen, new carpeting', 
central air, attached garage, largciot, just $49,500. 



REALTY WORLD 

A WORLD 
OF DIFFERENCE 



m 

REALTY WORLD 



MM¥] (312)395-1010 

P^nn Juliqn {J ° Y) Dliki 
dllU Llccnsed Broker 



ill. & Wis. • 

549 Lake Street 
Anlioch, III. 



.REAJ.IOR" 



^^*^^* 



*ttnnru 

irnwo 

itfYia 



OFFICE; 3 12/330.1301 



mls T&oodfand TZeatty 



(019 E. GRAND AVENUE 
LINDENHUR8T, ILLINOIS 00040 



We Need Help!! 

We have a position for a licensed 
sales person for a super active office. 
Both new construction & pre -owned 
homes. 



WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 



For Sale - Income Property 
2 unit apt. building. In 
Antioch. , l' block from 
shopping. 395-2022 or 
395-5070. 

21,22p 



WIS. Must sell 5 acres near 
fishing, swimming, boating 
and- deer hunting 4'fc to 5 
hour drive: Bergman - 
sacrifice. $900.00 complete' 
or terms. No agents, please. 
(312) 325-4145. 



Card of Thanks 



I wish to thank everyone so 
very much for their 
prayers, best wishes, get 
wrll and birthday — cards'. 



} 
/ 



Legal Notices 



sent to me while I was in 
the hospital. 

..__ Floyd Horton 



Services Offered 



Mopits Cleaning Service - 4 
helping hands to do any job 
you want done. Call Glenda 
395-6224 or Sharon 
395-1793. 

22c 





In a ritual of courtship, 
the male cardinal feeds 
its mate choice berries. 



LEGAL* 
ASSUMED BUSINESS 
NAME CERTIFICATE 
Name of Business: Se- 
quoit Harbor.. 

Address. where business 
is to be.conducted or trans- 
acted in. this county: 24921 
West Route 173," Antioch, 
Illinois 60002. 
' Name and Post Office or 
residence" address of : the 
person owning, conducting 
or transacting business: 
Robert Harris, 531 Garys 
Drive, Antioch, Illinois 
60002. 

State of Illinois, County 
of Lake; SS 

— T4iis-is-t0-eertify-that-tbe- 
undersigncd intends to con- 
duct the above named busi- 
ness from the location indi- 
cated and that the true or 
real full name of the person 
owning, conducting or 
transacting the business 
arc correct as shown. 

Robert Harris 
Nov. 7, 1978 

State of Illinois, County 
of Lake; SS 

The foregoing instru- 
ment was acknowledged 
before me by the person 
intending to conduct the. 
business this November 7, 
1978r 

:_:. Sandra L Panacekia 

. Notary Public 

^v (Seal) 

November 29, 1978 



LEGAL 
CLAIM NOTICE^/ 
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 
OF THE NINETEENTH 

- JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 
tAKE COUNTY .ILLINOIS 

PROBATE DIVISION 

Estate of Selma M. 

Trieger, Deceased, File No. 
78P795. 

Notice is given of the 
death of Selma M. Trieger 

: of Antioch, Illinois. Letters 
of Office were issued on 
November 9, 1978, to Ralph 
B. Trieger, 419 N. Wille, 
Mount Prospect, III., Ad- 
ministrator, whose attorney 
is Larson and Gantar, .P.O. 
Box O, Antioch, Illinois. 

Glaims-againsMhe-cstate- 

may be filed in the Probate 
office of the Clerk of said , 
Court, 18. N. County Street, 
Waukegan, Illinois, 60085 
within 6 months from the 
date of issuance of letters; 
any claim not so filed is 
barred as to the estate 
inventoried within that 
period. Also copies of 
claims must be mailed' or 
delivered to the Admini- 
strator, and to the attorney. 
Dawn Marie Mardoian 
Clerk of the 
Circuit Court 
Nov. 29, 1978 




BOWLING 

. WED. BUSINESSMEN 
NOV. 11, 19.78" 

High Team Series: A&B 
Printing 872,970,897 - 2739 
& High Individual Scorer: 
Ed Wasson. 166,225,203 
594. 

Vitos 2, Lasco's I; M&S 
Real Estate 2, Axtell Realty 
1; Schenning Ins. 2, Bill's 
Tpvacn 1-. A &B Prin ting 2:.. 



nleti&ea 

935 MAIN STREET. 

ANTIOCH. ILLINOIS 60002 

312-395-7515 




Kross Inn 1; First Bank 2, 
R&R Upholstery 1;' Pro- 
tronics TV 3, Van Pattens 0. 

CHAIN O'LAKES MIXED 
NOV. 22, 1978 

High Team Series: Can- 
field Beverages 796,849, 
760 - 2405, Antioch Savings 
& Loan 781,781,776'- 2338," 
Western Auto 759.769,800 - 
2328, Ace Hardware 766, 
-787,780 - 2328. _ - 
High Individual Men:. Jim" 
Long 194,212,246 -.652, 
Denny Swanson 194,215, 
214 - .623,. Pete Cleven 
.136,220,196-552. 

High Individual Women: 
Jean Haling 163,193,166 -= 
522; Gail Filipl40, 199, 158- 
497. 

Lupas Resort 2, Halings 
Resort 1; Antioch Savings 
&Loan 3, Flower Hut 0; 
Body Craft 3, Erich's Auto 
Repair 0; Western Auto 2, 
"C: Frank Realty 1 ; Canfield 
Beverages 2, First National 
Bank I; Ace Hardware 3, 
Valca Drafting 0. 



BE WISE: ADVERTJSJE 



1A 



t 1 120 GOLF ROAD ; 

WAUKEGAN, ILLINOIS 
312-249-2880 

PRETTY AS A PICTURE 

Is this attractive 4+ bedroom Cape Cod. Large 
living room, country kitchen with patio doors to 
20x20 redwood deck, den with brick, fireplace, Plus 
huge rec room in basement. 3 A Acre beautiful yard, 
new asphalt drive and 2Vi detr heated garage. Pride 
of ownership can be yours for only $89,500.00 #623. 

IF YOU HAVE 3 WISHES 

For Convenie nce. Comfort and Quality - .Tiisttflk^a, 



look at this 3 bedroom brick townhouse. Located 
only minutes from shopping, completely wall- 
papered, paneled and carpeted in the best of taste. 
Full basement with finished, family room. Many 
more extras. Call to see your wishes come true. 
Priced only $46,500.00 #560. 

THE PRICE??... IT'S NICE1J1 
And look at ALL you get! Good neighborhood, 2 
bedroom mother-in-law apartment with separate 
entrance or the possibility of a large FIVE bedroom 
home. Priced at $35^000.00 #6137 



HELP WANTED 

Banquet and dining 
room waitresses, ex- 
perience preferred. 

Salad woman or salad 
girl. 

Bus help and dish- 
washers. 

Andres Steak House 
— lll06-tJ;SrRrT2— 

Vi mile north of Rt. 173 
on Rt. 12, Richmond, 

(815)678-2671 



mm 



n 



TENP1N TOPPLERS 
NOV. 21, 1978 

High Individual Series: 
Jeri Tolna 183,191,191 - 
565. Char Horsch 191,188, 

180 - 559. ;;g 

High Team Series: 
Carousel 807,892.813 - 2512 

Carousel 4, Piggy Bank 
0; H. Gaston Printers 3, 
Anderson Heating UT;-= 
Limerick Lounge 3, Corri- 
gan's Roaring 20*s 1; Peg- 
gy's Place 4, , Hartnell 
Chevy 0; A&B Printing 2, 
Communication Gap 2; Nail 
Benders 3, Quaker In- 
dustries 1. • , 




The word cadet comes from a 
French term meaning "little 
f head." 



A DREAM COME TRUE 
Newly remodeled alum. Cape Cod is ready for you. 
Large rooms, 3 bedrooms, full, basement. Paneled 
and heated greenhouse for the green thumb in your 
family. Also I car garage and 16x16 barn, ALL on V* 
acre. Priced $50,900^00 #625. ± 



Call Chris Jackson 

for a CONFIDENTIAL interview 

at $56^1 561 

0^356-2302 after hours. 

rafitt! YOU'LL LIKE »< 



After /office hour*, feel fret t. calt any of uj at hone. 
Mice Schaeffer^ J$5-W-y F 'enc^Mar.fewa/4^tt^M+? 
Don Hendrixson. XS-16SS ( 
'TaiOi PilcHer. S$S-79i3 



FOR THE SELECr FEMALE 
Out of ""the pages -of your better decorating 
magazines comes this Exclusive Brand New Raised"* 
Ranch. Kitchen has beautiful solid wood cabinets, 

' no-wax floors, dishwasher and,, garbage disposal. 

' Twry full baths with ceramic tile and terrazzo 
floors^ : _Dynamic Jamify. room /with cu-Stonf: built 
woodburning fireplace and 2V 3 car garage. ^Beauti- 
fully situated on almost aji Acre. Priced 592,500.00 

S*578. 




HORSE FARMETTE 

n ™ m f an f ch on approx. 9 acres. Morton barn 

and paddock. 1 acre.fresh water pond. $225 000 -' 



U|1:'n, 



POE & POE 
REALTOR'S 



i 



:s Jackson. l$t-23$2 



txel 



"EVERYIHIK6 WEsTOUCH 
TURMSTO SOLD" 



nrrmrmbi 



■505.0rchard I St.,Antioch, iEj 

, (312)395-7313 j 

2728 Grand Ave.,Waukegan, DTJ 

(312) 662-102lfi 



& 



1 . 



V 



ft 



'n 




.1 



i a 
:le 



OBITUARIES 



THE ANTIOCH I NEWS WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 29, 1978 Page 19 

^■"""nHiiiiimiiiiiiitiniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiaiHiiniiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiinuiinimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiHiiin 



— e 



/ 



\ 



™^ ! 



Robert W. Anderson 

Mr. Robert W. Anderson, 47, of Antioch passed away 
suddenly Thursday at North Side Hospital in Youngstown, 
Ohio. He was born Aug. 13, 1931 in Chicago and lived in 
Antioch for the past 18 years. 
He was a member of the Antioch Evangelical Free 
Church and served in the U.S. Army during the Korean 
Conflict.. He was a general contractor in Antioch for 
several years. ■ " 

Survivors include his widow, Anna Louise; three 
daughters, Kathy, Karen and Robin; one son, Bobby (all at 
home); his mother Anna J. Anderson of Antioch; four, 
sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Evans, Youngstown, Ohio and 
Mrs. Ruth Tjernlund of Albany, Oregon, Mrs. Anna Mae 
Dziki of Lake Villa and Mrs. Esther Solomon* of Palm 
Springs, Calif.; one brother, Richard Anderson of Villa 
Park. 

Memorial services were held Monday, Nov. 27 at the 

Antioch Evangelical Free Church with Rev. Jim Gwinn 

~offrciirtrngTPfivate interment was in Home Oak Cemetery, 

near Antioch. Arrangements were made by Strang Funeral 

Home. 

Iver O. Eide, M.D. 

Iver 0. Eide, M.D., 83 of Antioch and Sarasota, Fla. 

died, Saturday, Nov. 25 at Victory Memorial Hospital in 

. Waukegan. He was born May 22, 1895 in Chicago and Had 

divided his time between Antioch and Sarasota for many 

years. 

Dr. Eide attended the Chicago College of Medicine & 
Surgery, graduating in 1916 and; was a general 
practicioner and industrial surgeon on the northwest side. 

He was a member of the 50 year club of American 
Medicine; the West Irving Blair Masonic Lodge No. 271, 
AF & AM in Chicago and Medinah Temple of the Shrine' 
and. the Sarasota Shrine Club in Florida. 

On May 14, 1924- he married Grace B. Mitchell, a 
graduate of Chicago College of Medicine and North 
Western. University Law School. 

Survivor.s include .his widow Grace; one son, Elling O. 
Eide of Sarasota. He was preceded in death by two 
brothers and two sisters. 

Funeral services were held Tuesday in Orland Park 
United Methodist Church in Orland Park. Burial was in 
Brooks Cemetery; Orland Park. Friends called at the = 
Strang Funeral Home, Antioch. 



Mary A. Podstawa 

Mrs. Mary A. Podstawa, 55, of Antioch passed away 
Sunday at Lake Forest Hospital. She was born May 21, 
1923 in Pennsylvania and lived in Chicago for several years 
before moving to Antioch 16 years aog. 

She was a member of St. Peter's Church. She married 
John W. Podstawa May 23, 1952. 

Survivors include her husband, John W.; two sons, 
Patrick (Pamela) of Waukegan, Paul W. (Victoria) of Zion; 
her mother, Mrs. Mary Szaflarski of Detroit, Mich.; four 
brothers; three sisters and two grandchildren. 

Funeral Mass was held Tuesday at St. Peter's Church in 
Antioch. Interment was in Hillside Cemetery. . Friends 
called at the Strang Funeral Home on Monday. 



Sportsman Corner 



The trophy largemouth that hits the angler's lure' next 
spring may be credited to a unique fisheries management 
technique the Illinois Department of Conservation has 
been using for nearly 20 years to limit the impact of winter 
fish kills. 

The technique is "aeration," and it will be used in-three 
northern Illinois lakes this- year to maintain open water, 
increasing the chances of sport fish survival, according to 
-.James Allen, ' fisheries biologist. The conservation 
department plans . to use aerators at Turner Lake, 
Johnson-Sauk Trail Lakeland Argyle Lake. 



"THE IDEA IS to keep the lake from freezing over 
completely," Allen explained, "maintaining some areas of 
open water so you won't have oxygen depletion which 
would result in a fish kill.*' 

Winter fish kills-may occur when a lake is frozen over for 
an extended period of time. If the ice is thick or covered by 
-snowt-the-sunlight-that-normally-reache s aqua tic~plants~in~ 




more quickly than the younger specimens. For that reason 
the trophy lunkers that fish men pursue all summer are 
usually among the first to die in a winter kill. 

In severe winters such as Illinois experienced. the past 
two years, winterkijl Can be a problem in lakes throughout 
the state. But it is a particular problem in northern Illinois 
where lakes are expected to freeze over the long periods 
even in normal winter seasons. 

In' determining which lakes will be aerated, Allen 
considered the location of the lake and its physical 
characteristics. 

Shallow lakes in northern Illinois which have high levels 
of organic material are -particularly susceptible to winter 
fish kills . due to oxygen depletion, Allen said. Lakes 



the lake is cut off. As a result, the plants die and the 
process in which aquatic vegetation releases oxygen 
ceases. 

The problem is further complicated by the fact that once 
the plants are dead, they begin using up available oxygen 
as they decay. The resulting oxygen depletion normally 
takes its toll, particularly among sport fish species. 



"WINTERKILL AFFECTS 
more drastically," Allen said. " 



-/- 



sports species in general 
It has less effect on certain 
non-game species such as bullhead." 
Older and larger fish also succumb to oxygen depletion 



t\ Tjjj IS JM IS — »S' ^ IS 'tm V\ 'gm ftj g» IS jg» Bj \im f 



matching that' description get priority when it comes time 
to install aerators in state- managed lakes. 

One type of aerator is floated on the .surface of the lake 
and distributes warmer water (about 39 degrees) from the 
lake's bottom to impede the development of ice oh the 
surface. A second type sits on the lake bottom and 
efferveses air bubbles which rise to the surface, bringing 
with them the ice-hindering wanner water. 

Allen said persons should be wary about venturing onto 
the ice where aerators are in use. , 

"The ice may be perfectly sound near the shore," Allen 
explained, "but it will be thin near the open areas and 
people should stay well away from them." 




v{OV>* 



o*** 
6*** 





THERE'S STILL TIME TO ORDER YOUR 

Christmas Cards 

from our , 
LARGE SELECTION 

We have the card for. you. 
PERSONAL OR COMMERCIAL 



Kftfas % MHNTIM SttVlCt Inc. 

For All Your Printing Needs 

LETTERPRESS -- OFFSET 

966 VICTORIA STREET K^p iTANTIOCH, ILL. 

PHONE 395-4111 




June M. Rayniak 



Mrs. June. M„ Rayniak, 29, of Salem passed away 
Thursday. Nov. 23, .at Victory Memorial Hospital in, 
Waukegan, from injuries received in an auto accident on 
Rt. 59 Nov. 18. 

She was born Feb. 12. 1949 in Chicago and had lived in 



...ATTEND THE CHURCH 



OF YOUR CHOICE THIS SUNDAY 



p ■■ ■ " Jl T " " > ' "* — """ "~ *' * * — ■ — "" ■ — ° — — ■ ■■ ' - * ■ ■ * — -■ * 

Schiller Park and Antioch before moving to Salem two 
years ago. 

She was a member of Holy Name Church in Wilmot and 
had worked part-time for Illinois Bell Telephone Co, 

Survivors include her husband, John; one son, Andrew 
and one daughter, Marcia; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Marshall Sparesus of Schiller Park; one brother, Edward 
Sparcsus of West Chicago; one sister, Sandra Sparesus of 
Schiller Park. • 

Funeral mass was said Monday. at Holy Name Church, 
with burial in Holy Name Cemtery. Strang Funeral Home^ 
in Antioch was in charge of arrangements. 



Directory-of^erviees-/n-* he-An 




Area. 



Faith Evangelical Lutheran 

.PASTOR DARAID GRUEN 

1275 Main St., Antioch 

Worship Services - Sunday at 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday School at 9:15 a.m. 



St. Ignatius Episcopal 






REV. T.A. BESSETTE Rector 

983 Main St., Antioch 

:Holy Eucharist - 8 a.m. Sunday. Choral Eucharist and 

Church, School, 9:30 a.m. Sunday 



== :> I 



BOWLING 

PINSPOTTERS 
NOV. 24, 1978 

High Team Game: Pad- 
dock Lake Pharmacy_849." 

High Team Series: 
Awards by KayDan, 2376. 

High Individual Game: 
Betty Schnieder, 220V 

High Individual ^Series; 
Betty Schnieder, 573. 

Paddock Lake Pharmacy 
3, General Business .Ser- 
vices 1. 

Cermak American Fam- 
ily Ins. 3, Hahns Jewelry 1 ; 
Rittenhouse & Embree 3, 
Inland Harbor IT Genesis 3, 
Bernie's Deli 1 ; Awards by 
KayDan 2. R&R Upholstery- 
2; Jim Beam 2,SLakeside 
Resort 2. 



N Restorations 

Your chorished memories 
don't have to stay locked 
away in that attic trunk or 
in the old family album 
you pored over as a child7 
They can be made to glow 
again ... in an hono'red 
place in your home or as a 
gift to someone dear^ 

Stop in soon and 
bring your old : 
photographs 

for an estimate :>li 



% 



Rush Studwn 



141 Cheri Lane 

Antioch 
395-5554^3 



United Methodist Church of Antioch St. Peter's Roman Catholic 

REV. STEPHEN W. WILLIAMS Pastor 

1 848 Main St., Antioch . - 

Worship Services - Sunday at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 
Church school at 9:15 

Millburn Congregational 

REV. DONALD A. McPEEK~ Pastor 
Millburn 
Worship Services Sunday at 10 a.m. 
Church School Sunday at 10 a.m. 

St. Stephen^ Lutheran 

REV. PHILIP O. LAURIN Pastor 

Hillside and Rte. 59,.Antioch 

Worship Services -Sunday at 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday School at 9:15 

Calavary Baptist Church _ 

REV. JAMES REED 

554 Parkway, Antioch — 

Sunday School 9:45 - Worship 11 a.m. Training 
Union 6 p.m. - Eve. Worship 7 p.m. 



REV. FRANCIS L. JOHNSON Pastor 

557 Lake St.. Antioch 

^Schedule of Masses - Saturday at 5:30 p.m., Sunday at 

.6:30, 8:00, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m., and 12 noon m 



Antioch Evangelical Free Church 

Tiffany Rd. and Highview Drive, Antioch , 

Worship - 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday, 7:30 Thursday.' 
Sunday School - 9:45 a.m. Sunday. 

First Church of Christ, Scientist 

Rte. 173 and Harden St., Antioch 
Services - Sunday at 11 a.m., Wednesday at 8 p.m. 
Sunday School, 11 a.m. ^ 



Brought to you by 
Rotary Club - 




of Antioch. 





Page 20 

Speedway 
plans April 
car show 

The Waukegan Speed- 
way will begin its 1979 
racing season with a car 
show in April at Lakehurst 
Shopping Center. 
. The ..show- will be held 
from Monday,. Apr. 2, 
through Friday, Apr. "6. 

Car owners wishing to 
enter should notify Mike 
Bab'tcz, (312) 689-3097 
before Jan. 1. 

THE SPEEDWAY will 
begin its second season on 
—the - quarter-mile-elay— sur^ 
face with late model stock 
cars and hobby stocks on 
Saturday. Apr. 7. The gates 
will open for registration 
and practice at 4 p.m. with 
qualifying at 7 and racing at 
8. 

Sunday racing begins on 
Apr. 8 with a new starting 
time. Gates will open at 5 
p.m. with qualifying at 6 
and races at 7. 

This should enable" 
"everyone to get home early" 
before returning to work on 
Monday," Babicz said: 

The 1979 Speedway pace 
car will be . a Chevrolet 
Camaro. 



THE ANTIOCH NEWS WEDNESDAY . 

Basketball league 
plays again Dee. 7 

The new Antioch Men's Basketball League, composed 
of former area high school and junior college stars, is 
taking two weeks off after its first round of action. 

The next games will be played Thursday, Dec. 7, at the 
south, gym of Antioch High School, . 

HER E, IS THE schedule for that night: 
6:30 p.m. —Limerick Lounge (5-6) vs. BJ's Sports (1-4). 
~ 7:30 — The Wharf (1-4) vs., Century 21 (4-1). 
8:30 — Maestrazi's (3-2) vs.. State Bank (1-4).. 



LEADING SCORERS after the first round of play are Mike 
,* Perone of Limerick with 76 points in five games, Steve 
Pilcher of The Wharf with 61, and Mike Tylkowski of 
Limerick with 56. 




B 



NOVEMBER 29, 1,978 

The Whisper of a pretty girl can be heard further than the roar of a lion. 



John Janosko of Maestrazrs"has"52 _ ahd-three-players 
are tied with 47 points: Steve Dobner and Steve Owens of 
Century 21 and Don Norwick of The Wharf, 



First Church of Christ, Scientist 
Route 173 and Harden Street 
Antioch, Illinois - 

Services: Sundays- 11 a.m. 
Wednesdays - B p.m. ^ 
Sunday School- 11 a.m. 





A little boy approached 

Santa Claus at aChurch par- 

. ty. He.had^ waited =_all year 

for this privilege. In his hand 

he carried a-lisf of everything 

ne wanted: a bicycle, a' wagon, 

a chemistry set, a train, a 

football, a portable radio, v a 

small television set, and roller 

skates." He read iVoff to Santa. 
"Thar's a long list," said 
Santa. 7 'Til have to check to 
see if you were a good boy." 
"Don't check," Santa, 
please don't check," cried the 
boy. 'Til be satisfied just 
to take the roller skates." 



Here's what 
you've been 
waiting 




■ / 



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b a a a p. pj jtiu-fljuum 



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Ready To 
HelpOut 
Anytime 



II you? should have 
questions about any 
prescribed or over- 
the-counter medi- 

. cine, our pharma- 
cists will gladly help. 
See us for phar- 

• macy needs. 



StoplnToday 

Reeves 




fhorje 395-3606 

901 Mam Street 
Antioch 




Yes, for the second year in a.row, new First 
Bank Christmas Club members can pur- 
chase (in time for Christmas)^ second 

I piece, in our numbered, ^limited edition 
series of Pickard China. Each plate in this 

- series is designed with a beautiful Currier 
&. Ives winter scene. . .a perfect Christmas 
gift or display item. 

FirstfBank will continue this special offer 
for four years^A limiied; number of last 
year's Pickard- Chma^plates^ isSavailable^ 
this year^ should you wish to>haye a com-s 
fpletejset^ 

To get; this year's piece, simply open a First? 
Bank Christmas Club Account. Depending 
on/how much; you agree to deposit eachj 
week, you receive/ your beautiful" China 
plate at only a nominal cost as o.utlinedin 



the price schedule below. Next November, 
well send you a check for the full amount 
of your Christmas dub Account, plus 
interest. 

So don't delay. Enrojl in a First Bank 
Christmas Club Account andf start your 
collection of exquisite Pickard China while 
quantities last. At First Bank, we work 
for you. 




/ 






tfebMfnyk 



First National Bank of Antioch = 
485 Lake Street, Antioch, Ml. 60002,, (312)^95-3111 
Member FDIC